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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IPM STRATEGIES FOR MANAGING PESTS OF SUBTROPICAL ROW CROPS Title: Comparing in-season external and internal signs of feeding caused by sucking bugs to damage at harvest, with emphasis on creontiades signatus

Authors
item Brewer, Mike -
item Anderson, Darwin -
item Armstrong, John

Submitted to: National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: February 1, 2011
Publication Date: February 12, 2011
Citation: Brewer, M., Anderson, D., Armstrong, J.S. 2011. Comparing in-season external and internal signs of feeding caused by sucking bugs to damage at harvest, with emphasis on creontiades signatus. National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference. pgs. 789 - 792.

Interpretive Summary: Cotton along the Texas Coastal Bend experienced loss to boll-feeding sucking bugs during 2010, especially in fields near the coast. This loss was magnified due to boll rot. C. signatus was the dominate speCies, and it was associated with boll rot in past lab work (Armstrong et al. 2009b) and now in the field. For monitoring purposes, harvest risk was well correlated with in-season field monitoring by inspecting green bolls for internal signs of feeding (cracking bolls to check for probe markings on the internal carpel wall and/or stained lint and seed). External signs of feeding were very common, but not useful as in-season indicators of damage at harvest.

Technical Abstract: Sucking bug management in cotton has increased in importance, now with less pressure from boll weevil and boll-feeding worms. Cotton along the Texas Coastal Bend experienced loss to boll-feeding sucking bugs during 2010, especially in fields near the coast. This loss was magnified due to boll rot. C. signatus was the dominate species, and it was associated with boll rot in past lab work (Armstrong et al. 2009b) and now in the field. For monitoring purposes, harvest risk was well correlated with in-season field monitoring by inspecting green bolls for internal signs of feeding (cracking bolls to check for probe markings on the internal carpel wall and/or stained lint and seed). External signs of feeding were very common, but not useful as in-season indicators of damage at harvest.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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