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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SUNFLOWER GERMPLASM DEVELOPMENT FOR IMPROVED INSECT AND DISEASE RESISTANCE

Location: Sunflower Research

Title: Establishment and host effects of cereal aphids on switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) cultivars

Authors
item Burd, John -
item Prasifka, Jarrad
item Bradshaw, Jeffrey -

Submitted to: Southwestern Entomologist
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 30, 2012
Publication Date: June 1, 2012
Citation: Burd, J.D., Prasifka, J.R., Bradshaw, J.D. 2012. Establishment and host effects of cereal aphids on switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) cultivars. Southwestern Entomologist. 37(2):115-122.

Interpretive Summary: Potential for widespread plantings of switchgrass as a source for biomass prompted its evaluation as a host for important cereal aphids. Seedlings of four varieties of switchgrass, 'Kanlow', 'Blackwell', 'Cave-In-Rock', and 'Sunburst', were evaluated as hosts for greenbug (biotypes E, I, and Florida), Russian wheat aphid (biotype 2), bird-cherry oat aphid, corn leaf aphid, English grain aphid, and yellow sugarcane aphid. Greenbug biotype E and Russian wheat aphid biotype 2, both economically important cereal aphids in the United States, and English grain aphid were unable to establish on any of the switchgrass cultivars. However, greenbug biotypes I and Florida, bird-cherry oat aphid, corn leaf aphid, and yellow sugarcane aphid established on all cultivars tested. The aphids which successfully established on switchgrass also reduced plant growth (number of leaves added and leaf biomass), usually by 50% or more. Interactions between greenbug biotypes and cultivars, along with observations of other aphids on switchgrass cultivars, suggest there is potential for developing cultivars resistant to specific aphids and biotypes.

Technical Abstract: Potential for widespread plantings of switchgrass, Panicum virgatum L., as a biomass feedstock prompted its evaluation as a host for economically important cereal aphids. Seedlings of four cultivars of switchgrass, 'Kanlow', 'Blackwell', 'Cave-In-Rock', and 'Sunburst', were evaluated as hosts for greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani), biotypes E, I, and Florida; Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia (Kurdj.), biotype 2; bird-cherry oat aphid, Rhopalosiphum padi (L.); corn leaf aphid, R. maidis (Fitch); English grain aphid, Sitobion avenae (F.); and yellow sugarcane aphid, Sipha flava (Forbes). Greenbug biotype E and Russian wheat aphid biotype 2, both economically important cereal aphids in the United States, and English grain aphid were unable to establish on any of the switchgrass cultivars. However, greenbug biotypes I and Florida, bird-cherry oat aphid, corn leaf aphid, and yellow sugarcane aphid established on all cultivars tested. The aphids which successfully established on switchgrass also reduced plant growth (number of leaves added and leaf biomass), usually by 50% or more. Interactions between greenbug biotypes and cultivars, along with observations of other aphids on switchgrass cultivars, suggest there is potential for developing cultivars resistant to specific aphids and biotypes.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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