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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SUSTAINABLE DRYLAND CROPPING SYSTEM FOR THE CENTRAL GREAT PLAINS

Location: Central Plains Resources Management Research

Title: Management practices influence productivity of degraded or eroded soils

Authors
item Mikha, Maysoon
item Stahlman, Phillip -
item Benjamin, Joseph
item Geier, Patrick -

Submitted to: Extension Reports
Publication Type: Research Notes
Publication Acceptance Date: February 24, 2012
Publication Date: April 1, 2012
Citation: Mikha, M.M., Stahlman, P.W., Benjamin, J.G., Geier, P.W. 2012. Management practices influence productivity of degraded or eroded soils. Kansas Fertilizer Research Extension Reports. 1066:26-28.

Interpretive Summary: In the central Great Plains region, soil degradation is a consequence of soil organic matter losses due to soil disturbance and plant residue decomposition. Continuous tillage promotes soil organic matter decomposition and enhances soil erosion. Although no-tillage minimizes soil disturbance and promotes soil organic matter accumulation, manure amendment can restore the productivity of degraded/eroded soils by improving the nutrient status and increasing soil organic matter levels. The objectives of this study were to (1) identify the rate of beef manure necessary to supply nitrogen to the dryland cropping system and (2) evaluate the advantages of using manure as an amendment versus managing those same eroded soils with chemical fertilizer. Winter wheat yield and wheat biomass production were increased by manure addition compared with commercial fertilizer. Wheat yield and wheat biomass were not influenced by nitrogen (N) rate and tillage practices. Over¬all, manure addition improved the productivity of eroded soil. More analysis is being conducted to evaluate manure amendment on different aspects of soil quality in this eroded/degraded soil.

Technical Abstract: Management practices influence the productivity of eroded or degraded soil. This study investigates the influence of beef manure amendment compared with commercial fertil¬izer (urea) applied at two rates (60 and 120 lb N/a) with two tillage practices (conven¬tional tillage, CT, and no-tillage, NT). In 2006, a study site was established on eroded/ degraded soil at the Kansas State University Agricultural Research Center–Hays in Hays, KS. In 2011, winter wheat yield and wheat biomass production were greatly influenced by manure addition compared with commercial fertilizer. Wheat yield and wheat biomass were not influenced by nitrogen (N) rate and tillage practices. Over¬all, manure addition improved the productivity of eroded soil. More analysis is being conducted to evaluate manure amendment on different aspects of soil quality in this eroded/degraded soil.

Last Modified: 9/22/2014
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