Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED PEANUT GERMPLASM AND RESISTANCE TO DISEASE AND NEMATODE PESTS Title: Marker-assisted selection for biotic stress resistance in peanut

Authors
item Burow, Mark -
item Leal-Bertoli, Soraya -
item Simpson, Charles -
item Ozias-Akins, Peggy -
item Chu, Ye -
item Denwar, Nicholas -
item Chagoya, Jennifer -
item Starr, James -
item Moretzsohn, Marcio -
item Pandey, Manish -
item Varshney, Rajeev -
item Holbrook, C
item Bertioli, David -

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: August 1, 2012
Publication Date: January 15, 2013
Citation: Burow, M.D., Leal-Bertoli, S., Simpson, C.E., Ozias-Akins, P., Chu, Y., Denwar, N., Chagoya, J., Starr, J.L., Moretzsohn, M.C., Pandey, M., Varshney, R.K., Holbrook Jr, C.C., Bertioli, D. 2013. Marker-assisted selection for biotic stress resistance in peanut. In: R. Varshney and R. Tuberosa (eds). Translational Genomics for Crop Breeding: Volume 1 - Biotic Stress. John Wiley & Sons Inc. New York. pp. 125-150.

Interpretive Summary: Peanut ranks second to soybean in the world market trade of oilseeds both in area grown and tonnage produced, and is well-suited to contribute significantly to poverty reduction in the developing world. Peanut is a tetrapoid of recent origin, and has shown low levels of molecular marker polymorphism. Attempts to utilize wild species as sources of new alleles have been met with limited success because of genomic and ploidy barriers. Marker-assisted selection has lagged behind other major crops. This is due in large part to the genetic bottleneck that occurred at tetraploidy, resulting in a limited amount of molecular variability detectable among accession of the cultivated species. However, marker maps have been developed from wild species, and, to an increasing extent, the cultivated species using new marker types. It is expected that, with the increase in number of SSR markers and development of SNP-based markers, there will be greater use of MAS in both interspecific and cultivated accession crosses. Marker-assisted selection has already proven itself to be useful in developing cultivars possessing resistance to the root-knot nematode, and is being used for selection for resistance to late leafspot and rust, as well as for the high-oleic trait. It is expected that as the power of molecular tools increases and the cost decreases marker-assisted selection will be used to an increasing degree in this crop.

Technical Abstract: Peanut ranks second to soybean in the world market trade of oilseeds both in area grown and tonnage produced, and is well-suited to contribute significantly to poverty reduction in the developing world. Peanut is a tetrapoid of recent origin, and has shown low levels of molecular marker polymorphism. Attempts to utilize wild species as sources of new alleles have been met with limited success because of genomic and ploidy barriers. Marker-assisted selection has lagged behind other major crops. This is due in large part to the genetic bottleneck that occurred at tetraploidy, resulting in a limited amount of molecular variability detectable among accession of the cultivated species. However, marker maps have been developed from wild species, and, to an increasing extent, the cultivated species using new marker types. It is expected that, with the increase in number of SSR markers and development of SNP-based markers, there will be greater use of MAS in both interspecific and cultivated accession crosses. Marker-assisted selection has already proven itself to be useful in developing cultivars possessing resistance to the root-knot nematode, and is being used for selection for resistance to late leafspot and rust, as well as for the high-oleic trait. It is expected that as the power of molecular tools increases and the cost decreases marker-assisted selection will be used to an increasing degree in this crop.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page