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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DOMESTIC, EXOTIC, AND EMERGING DISEASES OF CITRUS, VEGETABLES, AND ORNAMENTALS (DEED) Title: Differential acquisition and transmission of Florida Tomato spotted wilt virus isolates by Western flower thrips

Authors
item Reitz, Stuart
item Adkins, Scott

Submitted to: American Phytopathology Society
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 1, 2012
Publication Date: August 1, 2012
Citation: Reitz, S.R., Adkins, S.T. 2012. Differential acquisition and transmission of Florida Tomato spotted wilt virus isolates by Western flower thrips. American Phytopathology Society. _.

Interpretive Summary: Thrips-vectored Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is one of the most important insect-vectored plant pathogens globally. The virus host range encompasses many key vegetable, ornamental and agronomic crops. TSWV populations are highly heterogeneous, which has important implications for vector relations and epidemiology. Although several thrips species can vector TSWV, Western flower thrips (WFT; Frankliniella occidentalis) is the most important vector in vegetable crops in Florida. We assessed the ability of WFT to acquire and transmit five independent local lesion isolates of TSWV derived from tomato, pepper or peanut. Sequence analysis revealed minimal variation in the N gene but substantially more in the glycoprotein precursor. First instar larvae were allowed to acquire the virus from infected tomato plants and then placed individually as adults on petunia leaf discs for transmission. Individual thrips and leaf discs were assayed by commercially available enzyme linked immunosorbent assay to determine whether TSWV acquisition and transmission had occurred. WFT larvae differentially acquired the five TSWV isolates from infected tomato plants. WFT adults differentially transmitted these isolates to petunia leaf discs. The efficiency with which WFT acquired isolates was not necessarily related to the efficiency with which they were transmitted. Our results demonstrate the importance of TSWV heterogeneity in its interactions with thrips vectors.

Technical Abstract: Thrips-vectored Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is one of the most important insect-vectored plant pathogens globally. The virus host range encompasses many key vegetable, ornamental and agronomic crops. TSWV populations are highly heterogeneous, which has important implications for vector relations and epidemiology. Although several thrips species can vector TSWV, Western flower thrips (WFT; Frankliniella occidentalis) is the most important vector in vegetable crops in Florida. We assessed the ability of WFT to acquire and transmit five independent local lesion isolates of TSWV derived from tomato, pepper or peanut. Sequence analysis revealed minimal variation in the N gene but substantially more in the glycoprotein precursor. First instar larvae were allowed to acquire the virus from infected tomato plants and then placed individually as adults on petunia leaf discs for transmission. Individual thrips and leaf discs were assayed by commercially available enzyme linked immunosorbent assay to determine whether TSWV acquisition and transmission had occurred. WFT larvae differentially acquired the five TSWV isolates from infected tomato plants. WFT adults differentially transmitted these isolates to petunia leaf discs. The efficiency with which WFT acquired isolates was not necessarily related to the efficiency with which they were transmitted. Our results demonstrate the importance of TSWV heterogeneity in its interactions with thrips vectors.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
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