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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICALLY-BASED TECHNOLOGIES FOR MANAGEMENT OF CROP INSECT PESTS IN LOCAL AND AREAWIDE PROGRAMS

Location: Insect Behavior and Biocontrol Research Unit

Title: Prospects for gene transmformation in insects

Authors
item Handler, Alfred
item O'Brochta, David -

Submitted to: Annual Review Of Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 1, 1990
Publication Date: February 1, 1991
Citation: Handler, A.M., O'Brochta, D.A. 1991. Prospects for gene transmformation in insects. Annual Review Of Entomology. 36:159-183.

Interpretive Summary: The ability to manipulate genetic material in vitro and integrate it into a host genome by scientists at the USDA Agricultural Research Service, Center for Medical Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology, Gainesville, Florida, has proven to be one of the more powerful methods of genetic analysis, as well as a means to manipulate an organism's biology. In insects,the use of gene transformation is equally significant in its potential to facilitate an under-standing of insect genetics, biochemistry, development, and behavior.A more complete understanding of insect biology would in turn certainly enhance current methods, and promote development of new methods, to manage populations of both beneficial and pest species. Despite the benefits to be derived from gene-transfer, the routine and efficient introduction of exogenous DNA into insect genomes is limited to the genus Drosophila . Although DNA has been integrated into the genomes of three mosquito species (76, 80, 86), this integration has apparently resulted from rare random integration events, and the utility of this method is uncertain.

Technical Abstract: The ability to manipulate genetic material in vitro and integrate it into a host genome has proven to be one of the more powerful methods of genetic analysis, as well as a means to manipUlate an organism's biology. In insects, the use of gene transformation is equally Significant in its potential to facilitate an under-standing of insect genetics, biochemistry, development, and behavior.A more complete understanding of insect biology would in turn certainly enhance current methods, and promote development of new methods, to manage populations of both beneficial and pest species. Despite the benefits to be derived from gene-transfer, the routine and efficient introduction of exogenous DNA into insect genomes is limited to the genus Drosophila . Although DNA has been integrated into the genomes of three mosquito species (76, 80, 86), this integration has apparently resulted from rare random integration events, and the utility of this method is uncertain.

Last Modified: 11/25/2014
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