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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Management Practices to Mitigate Global Climate Change, Enhance Bio-Energy Production, Increase Soil-C Stocks & Sustain Soil Productivity...

Location: Soil Plant Nutrient Research (SPNR)

Title: Understanding root-microbiome interactions

Authors
item Zolla, Gaston -
item Bakker, Matthew -
item Chaparro, Jacqueline -
item Sheflin, Amy -
item Badri, Dayakar -
item Manter, Daniel
item Vivanco, J -

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: September 12, 2012
Publication Date: March 17, 2013
Citation: Zolla, G., Bakker, M., Chaparro, J., Sheflin, A., Badri, D., Manter, D.K., Vivanco, J.M. 2013. Understanding root-microbiome interactions. In: Frans J. de Bruijn, editor. Molecular Microbial Ecology of the Rhrizosphere. New York, NY: Wiley & Sons, p. 743-754.

Interpretive Summary: Plants are sessile organisms and once established, individuals have little capacity to evade stressful conditions. Stress tolerance or coping mechanisms are vital to plants; therefore they have developed sophisticated innate mechanisms for monitoring and reacting to their environment. The environmental quality or stress experienced by plants is defined by interacting factors, including the soil, microbial activity and outcomes of the plant’s own activity (Figure 1). Root exudates, carbon-rich compounds released by plant roots, are particularly important in influencing microbial activities that can contribute to or alleviate plant stress. Here, we describe how specific soil microbes or microbial communities may help plants to overcome both biotic and abiotic stresses. However, our understanding of the signaling cross talk that is employed in both attracting and maintaining these microbial communities remains very incomplete (Barret et al., 2011; Ryan et al., 2009). Root exudates potentially play major roles in attracting and maintaining these beneficial soil communities, therefore we also review methods that have been employed to collect and characterize these compounds.

Technical Abstract: Plants are sessile organisms and once established, individuals have little capacity to evade stressful conditions. Stress tolerance or coping mechanisms are vital to plants; therefore they have developed sophisticated innate mechanisms for monitoring and reacting to their environment. The environmental quality or stress experienced by plants is defined by interacting factors, including the soil, microbial activity and outcomes of the plant’s own activity (Figure 1). Root exudates, carbon-rich compounds released by plant roots, are particularly important in influencing microbial activities that can contribute to or alleviate plant stress. Here, we describe how specific soil microbes or microbial communities may help plants to overcome both biotic and abiotic stresses. However, our understanding of the signaling cross talk that is employed in both attracting and maintaining these microbial communities remains very incomplete (Barret et al., 2011; Ryan et al., 2009). Root exudates potentially play major roles in attracting and maintaining these beneficial soil communities, therefore we also review methods that have been employed to collect and characterize these compounds.

Last Modified: 4/21/2014
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