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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SYSTEMATICS OF HEMIPTERA AND RELATED GROUPS: PLANT PESTS, PREDATORS, AND DISEASE VECTORS

Location: Systematic Entomology

Title: Tropidosteptes forestierae (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Miridae: Mirinae): A new species of plant bug injuring ornamental Florida swampprivet, Forestiera segregata (Oleaceae), in South Florida

Authors
item Henry, Thomas
item Caldwell, D. -
item Halbert, S. -

Submitted to: Insecta Mundi
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 27, 2012
Publication Date: June 15, 2012
Citation: Henry, T.J., Caldwell, D.L., Halbert, S.E. 2012. Tropidosteptes forestierae (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Miridae: Mirinae): A new species of plant bug injuring ornamental Florida swampprivet, Forestiera segregata (Oleaceae), in South Florida. Insecta Mundi. 0240:1-10.

Interpretive Summary: Plant bugs represent the largest family of true bugs and include numerous agriculturally important species. Many of these insects are serious pests, causing millions of dollars in damage to crops and ornamentals in the United States annually. This paper provides the description of a new species of plant bug found injuring ornamental hedges of Florida swampprivet in Collier County, Florida. The plant bugs were causing severe yellowish-tan spotting,with abundant dark varnishlike excrement on the undersides of the leaves. By late May or early June 2010, large portions of the hedge were completely defoliated and required insecticidal treatment. In this paper, we provide a color photographs of the adult male and female and fifth-instar nymph, egg, and host injury, illustrations of male genitalia, scanning electron photomicrographs of selected structures, and an identification key to 16 species to help distinguish this new pest from the other related southeastern U. S. species. This information will be of interest to a wide range of researchers, nursery and regulatory personnel, and Federal and state departments of agriculture working in landscaping, regulatory horticulture, and insect pest management.

Technical Abstract: The mirine plant bug Tropidosteptes forestierae, n. sp. is described from Collier County, Florida, where it was found causing serious injury to an extensive ornamental hedge of Florida swampprivet, Forestiera segretata (Jacq.) Krug & Urb. (Oleaceae). Adults, the fifth instar, and egg are described; color images of the adults, nymph, egg, and injury, scanning photomicrographs of selected adult structures, and illustrations of male genitalia are provided; and a key to help distinguish the 16 species of Tropidosteptes known to occur in southeastern United States is given.

Last Modified: 8/1/2014
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