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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Conservation Systems Research for Improving Evnironmental Quality and Producer Profitability Title: Integrated resistant pigweed control in the Southeast

Authors
item Monks, Dale -
item Price, Andrew
item Culpepper, Stanley -
item Marshall, Michael -
item Nichols, Robert -
item Patterson, Michael -
item Steckle, Larry -
item Kelton, Jessica -

Submitted to: National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 3, 2012
Publication Date: January 3, 2012
Citation: Monks, D., Price, A.J., Culpepper, S., Marshall, M., Nichols, R., Patterson, M., Steckle, L., Kelton, J. 2012. Integrated resistant pigweed control in the Southeast. In: Boyd, S., et al., editors. Proceedings of the National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference, January 3-6, 2012, Orlando, Florida. p. 141-145.

Interpretive Summary: Conservation agriculture has been highly effective in reducing soil erosion, increasing water holding capacity, and minimizing surface water contamination. The adoption of herbicide resistant crops facilitated successful implementation of conservation agriculture practices throughout the Southeast due to the effective weed control achieved with these cropping systems; however, the continuation of conservation tillage practices is jeopardized with recent development of herbicide resistant weed species including Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri). This collaborative project, funded through an NRCS Conservation Innovation Grant and Cotton, Inc., is designed to help educate farmers throughout the southern United States about the benefits of high residue cover crops as well as effective strategies for incorporation into current production practices. In general, inversion tillage + herbicide systems resulted in similar or less pigweed emergence compared to winter fallow systems at most locations. Integrated weed management programs incorporating heavy rye residues, currently recommended herbicides, and in some instances inversion tillage were most effective at controlling GR Palmer amaranth.

Technical Abstract: Conservation agriculture has been highly effective in reducing soil erosion, increasing water holding capacity, and minimizing surface water contamination. The adoption of herbicide resistant crops facilitated successful implementation of conservation agriculture practices throughout the Southeast due to the effective weed control achieved with these cropping systems; however, the continuation of conservation tillage practices is jeopardized with recent development of herbicide resistant weed species including Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri). Along with maximizing environmental benefits achieved through conservation practices, including the possibility of long-term increases in soil organic matter and consequent carbon fixation, the utilization of high residue cover crops can also provide substantial weed suppression and aid weed control for problematic weeds which limited herbicide options are available. This collaborative project, funded through an NRCS Conservation Innovation Grant and Cotton, Inc., is designed to help educate farmers throughout the southern United States about the benefits of high residue cover crops as well as effective strategies for incorporation into current production practices. In general, inversion tillage + herbicide systems resulted in similar or less pigweed emergence compared to winter fallow systems at most locations. Integrated weed management programs incorporating heavy rye residues, currently recommended herbicides, and in some instances inversion tillage were most effective at controlling GR Palmer amaranth.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
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