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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MANAGEMENT OF TEMPERATE FRUIT NUT AND SPECIALTY CROP GENETIC RESOURCES Title: A new species of Fragaria (Roseaceae) from Oregon

Author
item Hummer, Kim

Submitted to: Journal of Botanical Research Institute of Texas
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 6, 2012
Publication Date: July 1, 2012
Citation: Hummer, K.E. 2012. A new species of Fragaria (Roseaceae) from Oregon. Journal of Botanical Research Institute of Texas. 6(1):9-15.

Interpretive Summary: A new species of strawberry called "Fragaria cascadensis Hummer" that is native to the western high Cascade Mountains in Oregon, United States, is described. This species has 10 sets of chromosomes instead of having 8 sets like the native Virginian strawberry. It is similar to the a subspecies of the virginian strawberry (octoploid) but with some characters like those of the native alpine strawberry which has 2 sets of chromosomes. The three species can be distinguished based on differences in leaf shape, leaf hairs, and seed shape, and location.The newly named Cascade strawberry is found at elevations of 3,000 to 5,000 feet in the western Cascade Mountains from the Columbia River in the north, to the vicinity of Crater Lake in the south, in forest clearings and open meadows.

Technical Abstract: A new species Fragaria cascadensis Hummer endemic to the western high Cascade Mountains in Oregon, United States, is described. Fragaria cascadensis, a decaploid, is similar to F. virginiana subsp. platypetala (Rydbert) Staudt (octoploid) but with some characters like those of F. vesca subsp. vesca f. bracteata (Heller) Staudt (diploid). The three species can be distinguished based on differences in leaf morphology, adaxial leaf hairs, achene shape, and location. Fragaria cascadensis is found at elevations of 1,000 to 3,800 m in the western Cascade Mountains from the Columbia River in the north, to the vicinity of Crater Lake in the south, in sandy-clay loams of volcanic origin, in forest clearings and open meadows.

Last Modified: 11/22/2014
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