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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SOIL ORGANIC MATTER AND NUTRIENT CYCLING TO SUSTAIN AGRICULTURE IN THE SOUTHEASTERN USA Title: Grass roots of soil carbon sequestration

Author
item Franzluebbers, Alan

Submitted to: Carbon Management
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: January 4, 2012
Publication Date: February 13, 2012
Citation: Franzluebbers, A.J. 2012. Grass roots of soil carbon sequestration. Carbon Management. 3:9-11.

Interpretive Summary: Soils rooted with perennial grasses have high organic matter content, and therefore, can contribute to an agricultural future with high soil quality; a condition that can help to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions through soil carbon sequestration and improve a multitude of other ecosystem responses, including controlling water quality, improving water and nutrient cycling, and supporting biological diversity. A scientist at the USDA Agricultural Research Service in Watkinsville, Georgia described a viewpoint to suggest that agricultural soils will benefit from the re-introduction of perennial grasses and legumes into the landscape by regaining soil organic matter and strengthening their capacity for long-term productivity and environmental resiliency. A renewed research effort is needed towards effectively integrating grass roots into agricultural strategies for soil carbon sequestration. The food provisioning service of agriculture must be supported with appropriate conservation approaches, including the utilization of perennial grasses, for it to be fully functional and capable of meeting the growing demands on Earth’s natural resources.

Technical Abstract: Soils rooted with perennial grasses have high organic matter content, and therefore, can contribute to an agricultural future with high soil quality; a condition that can help to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions through soil carbon sequestration and improve a multitude of other ecosystem responses, including controlling water quality, improving water and nutrient cycling, and supporting biological diversity. A scientist at the USDA Agricultural Research Service in Watkinsville, Georgia described a viewpoint to suggest that agricultural soils will benefit from the re-introduction of perennial grasses and legumes into the landscape by regaining soil organic matter and strengthening their capacity for long-term productivity and environmental resiliency. A renewed research effort is needed towards effectively integrating grass roots into agricultural strategies for soil carbon sequestration. The food provisioning service of agriculture must be supported with appropriate conservation approaches, including the utilization of perennial grasses, for it to be fully functional and capable of meeting the growing demands on Earth’s natural resources.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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