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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ECOLOGY AND MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGY OF ZOONOTIC BACTERIAL PATHOGENS ASSOCIATED WITH DAIRY FARMS

Location: Environmental Microbial and Food Safety Laboratory

Title: Piloting the future: Results from a pilot study for changes in the animal sampling program for the national antibiotic resistance monitoring system (NARMS)

Authors
item Torrence, Mary
item Singer, R -
item Loneragan, G -
item Scott, M -
item Hofacre, C -
item Berghaus, R -
item Harhay, Dayna
item Edrington, Thomas
item Byrd, James
item Van Kessel, Jo Ann

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: September 30, 2011
Publication Date: December 4, 2011
Citation: Torrence, M.E., Singer, R., Loneragan, G., Scott, M., Hofacre, C., Berghaus, R., Harhay, D.M., Edrington, T.S., Byrd Ii, J.A., Van Kessel, J.S. 2011. Piloting the future: Results from a pilot study for changes in the animal sampling program for the national antibiotic resistance monitoring system (NARMS). Meeting Abstract.

Technical Abstract: A well recognized monitoring system for antimicrobial resistance in the U. S. is the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS). It was established in 1996 among the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), USDA, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). FDA coordinates the program, collects retail samples, and CDC collects human samples from FoodNet sites. USDA’s ARS oversees the animal sampling program for NARMS with collaboration on sample collection from APHIS and FSIS. The goals for the NARMS program are to: monitor trends in antimicrobial resistance from humans, retail meats, and animals, disseminate timely information, conduct research, and spread of antimicrobial resistance, and assist the FDA in making decisions related to the approval of safe and effective antimicrobial drugs for animals. Recent scientific reviews and reports (including the FDA Science report) have indicated the need for changes in the animal sampling program for the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS). Currently, ARS is conducting a 4 month pilot study to coordinate university and ARS scientists (with industry) to collect animal samples in representative geographical locations and to provide pilot data for FDA on the most representative and cost-effective sampling program. This pilot will be completed in December 2011. This presentation will discuss the challenges of developing an on-farm and slaughter sampling program for antimicrobial resistance in animals. Preliminary data will include sampling approaches, microbiologic methods, and sensitivities for feedlot and dairy cattle, broilers, and turkeys. Swine were not included because they were being sampled in a different pilot. Results will include the challenges, costs and benefits of this pilot and the potential of this program for long term monitoring of antimicrobial resistance in food animals.

Last Modified: 4/18/2014
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