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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: USING REMOTE SENSING AND GIS FOR DETECTING AND MAPPING INVASIVE WEEDS IN RIPARIAN AND WETLAND ECOSYSTEMS Title: Hyperspectral imagery for mapping crop yield for precision agriculture

Author
item Yang, Chenghai

Submitted to: Springer Verlag
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: October 9, 2012
Publication Date: N/A

Technical Abstract: Crop yield is perhaps the most important piece of information for crop management in precision agriculture. It integrates the effects of various spatial variables such as soil properties, topographic attributes, tillage, plant population, fertilization, irrigation, and pest infestations. A yield map can therefore be an indispensable input for variable rate application either by itself or in combination with other spatial information. Traditional satellite imagery such as Landsat and SPOT has long been used to monitor crop growing conditions and to estimate crop yields over large geographic areas. However, this type of imagery has limited use for assessing within-field yield variability because of its coarse spatial resolution, long repeat cycles, and slow data delivery. Therefore, airborne multispectral and hyperspectral imaging systems have been more widely used for assessing within-field crop growth and yield variation. Remote sensing imagery obtained during the growing season has potential not only for after-season management, but also for within-season management. This chapter presents a brief overview of high resolution remote sensing imagery for mapping crop yield variability and illustrates how airborne hyperspectral imagery can be used for crop yield estimation based on the work conducted at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) in Weslaco, Texas.

Last Modified: 8/29/2014
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