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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ENHANCING ANIMAL WELL-BEING, IMMUNOCOMPETENCE, AND PERFORMANCE IN SWINE AND BEEF CATTLE

Location: Livestock Issues Research

Title: Live yeast and citrus pulp supplementation reduces the presence of rectal Salmonella without impairing performance in young pigs

Authors
item Sanchez, Nicole
item Carroll, Jeffery
item Callaway, Todd
item Chevaux, Eric -
item Rosener, Dan -

Submitted to: American Society of Animal Science Southern Section Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 5, 2011
Publication Date: June 25, 2012
Citation: Sanchez, N.C., Carroll, J.A., Callaway, T.R., Chevaux, E., Rosener, D. 2012. Live yeast and citrus pulp supplementation reduces the presence of rectal Salmonella without impairing performance in young pigs [abstract]. Journal of Animal Science. 90:23(E-Suppl. 1).

Technical Abstract: The effect of supplementing the diets of young pigs with live yeast (LY) and/or citrus pulp (CP) on growth performance and the presence of Salmonella in various tissues following a dual lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Salmonella challenge was evaluated. Forty barrows (26+/-0.2 day of age; 7.8+0.2 kg body weight), housed in individual stanchions (1.2 x 0.6 m) with ad libitum access to feed and water, were assigned to 1 of 4 treatments (n=10/treatment): 1) Control (C), fed a commercial starter diet; 2) LY, fed the commercial diet supplemented with LY (200 g/ton; Lallemand Specialties Inc.); 3) CP, fed the commercial diet supplemented with CP (5% as fed); and 4) LY and CP (LYCP), diet supplemented with LY (200 g/ton) and CP (5% as fed). On day 13, intraperitoneal temperature (TIP) loggers were inserted into all pigs. On day 20, pigs were administered LPS (25 microgram/kilogram body weight) intraveneously at 0 h, and then orally dosed with Salmonella typhimurium (10^6 colony forming units/pig) at 3 h. On dy 24, pigs were humanely euthanized for the collection of intestinal contents and lymph tissue. Pigs and feeders were weighed on day 0, 6, 13, 19, and 24. Pre-challenge average daily gain was greater (P<0.01) in C and CP compared to LY and LYCP pigs. Pre-challenge feed intake was greater (P=0.01) in C, LY and LYCP, while feed:gain was lower (P=0.04) in CP pigs. However, post-challenge feed intake was greater (P<0.01) in the C and LY pigs. Pre-challenge, LY, CP and LYCP had lower TIP than C (P<0.01). An LPS-induced increase in TIP occurred within 1 h (P<0.01) post-LPS. Salmonella also induced an increase in TIP at approximately 60 h. Post-challenge TIP was lowest in LY and CP (P<0.01), with no difference between C and LYCP (P=0.44). There was no treatment effect on Salmonella counts in ileum (P=0.11) and cecum (P=0.23) contents collected 99 h post-challenge. However, Salmonella counts were lower in the rectum of LY and CP pigs (P<0.01) and were lower in the lymph of LY pigs (P<0.01) compared to C pigs. These data suggest that feeding LY or CP can reduce rectal Salmonella content and the febrile response of young pigs to a dual LPS and Salmonella challenge without negatively affecting pig performance.

Last Modified: 7/23/2014