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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: HIGHER DIPTERA PESTS OF LIVESTOCK, POULTRY, AND HUMAN HEALTH: INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT AND ADULT BIOLOGY

Location: Mosquito and Fly Research Unit

Title: An annotated checklist of the Stomoxyini (Diptera: Muscidae) of the Levant with new records from Lebanon, Syria, Jordan and Sinai Egypt

Authors
item Muller, Gunter -
item Hogsette, Jerome
item Revay, Edita -
item Kravchenko, Vasiliy -
item Schlein, Yosef -

Submitted to: Acta Parasitologica Et Medica Entomologica Sinica
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 1, 2011
Publication Date: December 1, 2011
Citation: Muller, G.C., Hogsette, Jr, J.A., Revay, E.E., Kravchenko, V.D., Schlein, Y. 2011. An annotated checklist of the Stomoxyini (Diptera: Muscidae) of the Levant with new records from Lebanon, Syria, Jordan and Sinai Egypt. Acta Parasitologica Et Medica Entomologica Sinica. 18(4):225-229.

Interpretive Summary: The Stomoxyini flies are a tribe with 10 genera and 49 known species worldwide. Adult flies are obligate blood feeders and several are major pests of domestic livestock. To better control these flies in the Levant, more information was needed about fly species and their biology. Eight species were collected where 2 were previously known. These new species records may indicate an increase in range, or a change in fly dispersal patterns.

Technical Abstract: The Stomoxyini are obligate blood feeders and several members of the tribe, especially Stomoxys and Haematobia, are major pests of domestic livestock causing billions of U.S. dollars in damages annually. Therefore, USDA-CMAVE scientists and Israeli scientists worked cooperatively to survey the species of Stomoxyini in the Levant. The following eight species were collected: Stomoxys calcitrans (Linnaeus, 1758), S. sitens Rondani 1873, S. nigra Macquart, 1851, Haematobia irritans (Linnaeus, 1758), H. minuta (Bezzi, 1892), Stygeromyia maculosa Austen, 1907, Haematobosca stimulans (Meigen, 1824), and H. atripalpis (Bezzi, 1895).

Last Modified: 8/21/2014