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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Processing Technologies to Prevent Weight Gain and Obesity Related Metabolic Diseases

Location: Healthy Processed Foods Research

Title: Prevention of obesity relatred metabolic diseases by processed foods containing soluble dietary fibers and flavonoids (abstract)

Author
item YOKOYAMA, WALLACE

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 20, 2011
Publication Date: June 2, 2011
Citation: Yokoyama, W.H. 2011. Prevention of obesity relatred metabolic diseases by processed foods containing soluble dietary fibers and flavonoids (abstract).

Technical Abstract: Asians and other non-caucasians are generally more susceptible to obesity related chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Viscous soluble dietary fibers such as cereal beta-glucans and psyllium reduce plasma cholesterol and postprandial glycemia in humans. We have studied the effects of viscous soluble fibers in an animal model of dietary obesity using the model fiber, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC). HPMC unlike natural fibers is not fermented and is more stable in food systems than natural fibers that can be degraded by endogenous enzymes. We found that in addition to plasma cholesterol lowering, HPMC and by analogy other viscous soluble fibers, also reduces abdominal adiposity, weight gain, fatty liver, and blood pressure elevation. HPMC also increases insulin sensitivity. In general HPMC reduces all or most of the characteristics of obesity related chronic metabolic diseases. HPMC alters expression of genes of cholesterol, bile acid and fat metabolism in the liver. HPMC is not absorbed by the body so the effects are entirely within the intestinal lumen. HPMC increases fat excretion in the feces and particularly saturated and trans fats. In recent years a low grade inflammation has been connected to metabolic disease. The source of the inflammation is believed to be the absorption of bacterial cell walls (lipopolysaccharides, LPS) through leakage of the tight junction between intestinal cells. Preliminary studies indicate that HPMC also decreases tight junction permeability and related expression of genes in adipose related to LPS induced inflammation.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014