Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SYSTEMATICS OF LEPIDOPTERA: INVASIVE SPECIES, PESTS, AND BIOLOGICAL CONTROL AGENTS

Location: Systematic Entomology

Title: Description of the early stages of Eccopsis galapagana Razowski & Landry (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), a defoliator of Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) DC (Fabaceae) in Colombia

Authors
item Gallego, K.
item Lerma, J.
item Echeverri, C.
item Brown, John

Submitted to: Journal of Lepidopterists Society
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 18, 2012
Publication Date: October 3, 2012
Citation: Gallego, K.R., Lerma, J.M., Echeverri, C.G., Brown, J.W. 2012. Description of the early stages of Eccopsis galapagana Razowski & Landry (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), a defoliator of Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) DC (Fabaceae) in Colombia. Journal of Lepidopterists Society. 66(3):156-167.

Interpretive Summary: The caterpillars of many moths in the family known as leaf-rollers are important pests of ornamental, forest, and crop plants, causing millions of dollars of damage annually. One of these species has recently become an outbreak pest of mesquite (locally known as algarrobo tree) in Colombia, significantly impacting this plant which is critical for shade and food for cattle in the silvopastoral systems there. The purpose of paper is to report these findings and present the first descriptions and illustrations of the caterpillar and its damage. This information will be of interest to those involved in cattle production and pest management in pasture lands, and scientists studying host-plant use in moths.

Technical Abstract: The biology and early stages of Eccopsis galapagana Razowski & Landry are described and illustrated for the first time; details of the adults also are provided. Under outbreak conditions, the species has become a serious pest of algarrobo tree (Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) DC.; Fabaceae) in Colombia. Although African members of the genus Eccopsis feed on a variety of different host plant families (e.g., Fabaceae, Rhizophoraceae, Stericulaceae, Anacardiaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Flagellariaceae, and Rutaceae), New World species of Eccopsis are recorded only from Fabaceae.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page