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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: FINGERPRINTING AND PROFILING METHODS FOR CHARACTERIZATION OF FOODS AND DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS

Location: Food Composition and Methods Development Lab

Title: Phenolic composition, anitproliferative and anti-inflammatory properties of conventional and organic cinnamon and peppermint

Authors
item Lv, Junli -
item Whent, Monica -
item Huang, Haiqiu -
item Lu, Yu -
item Charles, Denys -
item Liu, Linwei -
item Yu, Liangli (Lucy) -
item Luthria, Devanand

Submitted to: Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 30, 2011
Publication Date: June 1, 2012
Citation: Lv, J., Whent, M., Huang, H., Lu, Y., Charles, D., Liu, L., Yu, L., Luthria, D.L. 2012. Phenolic composition, anitproliferative and anti-inflammatory properties of conventional and organic cinnamon and peppermint. Food Chemistry. 132:1442-1450.

Interpretive Summary: This paper describes the extraction and analysis of phenolic phytochemicals from conventional and organic cinnamon and peppermint. Extraction of bioactive phytochemicals by different extraction procedures showed that better yields of phenolic phytochemicals were observed with accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) with 75% aqueous acetone. Caffeic acid was the most abundant phenolic acid in peppermint (2221.1 and 3452.1 (µg/g) in conventional and organic peppermint, respectively). Catechin, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, and ferulic acid were major phenolics in both spices. Four additional phenolic acids namely, syringic acid, gallic acid, vanillic acid, p-coumaric acid were also detected in both spices. There was no significant difference between conventional and organic spices in the composition of most individual phenolics (P < 0.05). The data presented in this manuscript will be of interest for the researchers and farmers involved with organic farming. This study indicates that cinnamon and peppermint may be used as dietary sources of bioactive phytochemicals that can be potentially used for improving human health. This work was done in collaboration with the University of Maryland, College Park.

Technical Abstract: Conventional and organic cinnamon and peppermint were investigated for their phenolic profile, antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties. Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) with 75% acetone was a better method than Soxhlet and overnight extraction for phenolic content and antioxidant capacity in both cinnamon and peppermint. Caffeic acid was the most abundant phenolic acid in peppermint (2221.1 and 3452.1 (µg/g) in conventional and organic peppermint, respectively). Catechin, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, and ferulic acid were major phenolics in both spices. Four additional phenolic acids namely, syringic acid, gallic acid, vanillic acid, p-coumaric acid were also detected in both spices. There was no significant difference between conventional and organic spices in the composition of most individual phenolics (P < 0.05). Conventional and organic peppermint and cinnamon extracts all exhibited strong antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory properties. Organic cinnamon and peppermint had stronger antiproliferative ability than conventional varieties. Cinnamon was more efficient in inhibiting Il-1ß and COX-2 expression, while peppermint showed better inhibitory effect on IL-6 and MCP-1. This study indicates that cinnamon and peppermint may be used as dietary sources of bioactive phytochemicals for improving human health.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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