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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MACRO- AND MICRONUTRIENT MODULATION OF BIOMARKERS OF CHRONIC DISEASE AND INDICATORS OF NUTRITIONAL ADEQUACY

Location: Food Components and Health Laboratory

Title: Moderate alcohol consumption and 24-hour urinary levels of melatonin in postmenopausal women

Authors
item Hartman, T -
item Mahabir, S -
item BAER, DAVID
item Stevens, R -
item Albert, P -
item Dorgan, J -
item Kesner, J -
item Meadows, J -
item Shields, R -
item Taylor, P -

Submitted to: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 23, 2011
Publication Date: October 19, 2011
Citation: Hartman, T.J., Mahabir, S., Baer, D.J., Stevens, R.G., Albert, P.S., Dorgan, J.F., Kesner, J.S., Meadows, J.W., Shields, R., Taylor, P.R. 2011. Moderate alcohol consumption and 24-hour urinary levels of melatonin in postmenopausal women. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 97(1):e65-e68.

Interpretive Summary: Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in women and alcohol consumption may increase risk for this disease. Low urinary melatonin concentrations from samples collected overnight have been associated with an increased risk for breast cancer among postmenopausal women. A controlled feeding study to test the effects of low to moderate alcohol intake on potential risk factors for breast cancer including serum and urinary levels of hormones and other biomarkers. Previously, we observed significant increases in concentrations of serum estrone sulfate and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) in participants after consumption of 15 or 30 g (1 or 2 drinks per day). In the present analysis we evaluated the relationship of alcohol consumption with a metabolite (urinary 6-sulphatoxymeltonin)of melatonin. A controlled diet that contained three levels of alcohol (control of no alcohol, 1 drink or 2 drinks/day was fed to healthy postmenopausal women during three 8-week periods in random order under conditions of weight maintenance. The melatonin metabolite was measured in 24-hour urine samples which were collected before the study began, at the mid point and end of the study. Melatonin metabolite did not change among the three treatments. These results are important to health care professionals making dietary recommendations regarding alcohol consumption to women at-risk for breast cancer.

Technical Abstract: Low overnight urinary melatonin metabolite concentrations have been associated with increased risk for breast cancer among postmenopausal women. The Postmenopausal Women's Alcohol Study was a controlled feeding study to test the effects of low to moderate alcohol intake on potential risk factors for breast cancer including serum and urinary levels of hormones and other biomarkers. Previously, we observed significant increases in concentrations of serum estrone sulfate and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate in participants after consumption of 15 or 30 g (one or two drinks) of alcohol per day. In the present analysis, we evaluated the relationship of alcohol consumption with 24-h urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (6-SMT) concentration (micrograms per 24 h). Healthy postmenopausal women (n = 51) consumed a controlled diet plus each of three treatments (a nonalcoholic placebo beverage or 15 or 30 g alcohol/d) during three 8-wk periods in random order under conditions of weight maintenance. 6-SMT was measured in 24-h urine samples that were collected at entry into the study (baseline) and at the midpoint (4 wk) and end (8 wk) of each of the three diet periods. Concentration of 6-SMT was not significantly modified by the alcohol treatment after adjustment for body mass index, hours of sleep, daylight hours, and baseline level of 6-SMT. These results suggest that low to moderate daily alcohol consumption does not significantly affect 24-h urinary levels of melatonin among healthy postmenopausal women.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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