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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: PRESERVATION, ENHANCEMENT, AND MEASUREMENT OF GRAIN QUALITY AND MARKETABILITY Title: Short Report: The effect of preservation methods on predicting mosquito age by near-infrared spectroscopy

Authors
item Dowell, Floyd
item Noutcha, Aline E. -
item Michel, Kristin -

Submitted to: American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 16, 2011
Publication Date: December 1, 2011
Repository URL: http://naldc.nal.usda.gov/download/54989/PDF
Citation: Dowell, F.E., Noutcha, A.M., Michel, K. 2011. Short Report: The effect of preservation methods on predicting mosquito age by near-infrared spectroscopy. American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 85(6):1093-1096.

Interpretive Summary: Malaria affects about 300 million people per year, primarily in developing countries. Mosquitoes must be about 8 days old to transmit malaria, thus it is important to determine the age structure of mosquito populations in order to determine the effectiveness of disease control programs. Current age-grading techniques require tedious dissections or DNA extraction. We developed a rapid technique using near-infrared spectroscopy to determine the age of fresh mosquitoes, but the requirement for fresh insects limits applications of this technique. Thus, in this study, we investigate whether age can be predicted from preserved insects. Results from this study show that age can be predicted from mosquitoes preserved with desiccants, ethanol, Carnoy, RNAlater, or refrigeration with confidence intervals less than 1.4 days. The best results were obtained from mosquitoes stored using desiccants, RNAlater, or refrigeration.

Technical Abstract: Determining mosquito age is important to evaluate vector control programs because the ability to transmit diseases is age-dependent. Current age-grading techniques require dissection or DNA extraction. Near-infrared spectroscopy has been used to rapidly and nondestructively determine the age of fresh mosquitoes, but the requirement for fresh insects limits applications of this technique. Thus, in this study, we investigate whether age can be predicted from preserved insects. Results from this study show that age can be predicted from mosquitoes preserved with desiccants, ethanol, Carnoy, RNAlater, or refrigeration with confidence intervals less than 1.4 days. The best results were obtained from mosquitoes stored using desiccants, RNAlater, or refrigeration.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
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