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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DISCOVERY AND UTILIZATION OF BIOACTIVE COMPONENTS FROM NEW CROPS AND AGRICULTURAL CO-PRODUCTS

Location: Functional Foods Research Unit

Title: Camelina meal increases egg n-3 fatty acid content without altering egg quality or production in laying hens

Authors
item Kakani, R -
item Fowler, J -
item Haq, A -
item Murphy, E -
item Rosenberger, -
item Berhow, Mark
item Bailey, C -

Submitted to: Lipids
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 10, 2012
Publication Date: July 6, 2012
Citation: Kakani, R., Fowler, J., Haq, A., Murphy, E.J., Rosenberger, T.A., Berhow, M.A., Bailey, C.A. 2012. Camelina meal increases egg n-3 fatty acid content without altering egg quality or production in laying hens. Lipids. 47:519-526.

Interpretive Summary: Camelina is an emerging North American oilseed crop rich in omega 3 fatty acids. Seedmeal produced after pressing to extract the oil contains high protein and residual omega 3 fatty acids. This meal was fed as a component (up to 10%) of a diet to egg-laying chickens and the eggs were evaluated. The camelina meal had no effect on the feeding and egg production as compared to the controls. The camelina diet eggs had higher egg shell strength, increased levels of omega 3 fatty acids, and higher levels of DHA. Because camelina contains glucosinolates, we check for glucosinolate and glucosinolate degradation products in the eggs and none were found. These results indicate that camelina meal is a viable dietary source of omega 3 fsatty acids for poultry and its inclusion results in eggs enriched with omega 3 fatty acids.

Technical Abstract: Camelina sativa is an oilseed plant rich in n-3 and n-6-fatty acids and extruding defatted seed meal results in high protein meal (~40%) containing residual n-3 fatty acids. We examined the effects of feeding extruded defatted camelina seed meal to commercial laying hens on egg production, quality, and fatty acid composition. Lohmann White Leghorn hens (29 week old) were randomly allocated to three dietary treatments (n=25 per treatment) and data collected over a 12-week production period. All the treatment groups were fed a corn soy based experimental diets containing 0% (control), 5% and 10% extruded camelina meal. There were no significant differences between groups in percent hen day egg production, feed consumed per dozen eggs, and total cholesterol content of yolk. Egg shell strength was significantly higher in both camelina groups compared to control. Egg total n-3 fatty acid content increased 1.9-fold in 5% Camelina group (117 +/- 24 mg/egg) and increased 2.7-fold in 10% Camelina group (161 +/- 19 mg/egg) compared to Control. A similar increase in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) content also occurred and the 10% group had 78 +/- 11 mg/egg. Because camelina contains glucosinolates in its meal, we examined if camelina inclusion in the rations resulted in glucosinolate accumulation in eggs. There were no detectable glucosinolates or the metabolic product isothiocyanates in the eggs of 5% Camelina and 10% Camelina treatment groups. These results indicate that camelina meal is a viable dietary source of n-3 fatty acids for poultry and its inclusion results in eggs enriched with n-3 fatty acids.

Last Modified: 9/2/2014