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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Managing Diseases and Pests of Honey Bees to Improve Queen and Colony Health Title: New evidence that Deformed Wing Virus and Black Queen Cell Virus are Multi-host pathogens

Authors
item Zhang, Xuan -
item He, Shaoyu -
item Evans, Jay
item Pettis, Jeffery
item Yin, Gefen -
item Chen, Yanping

Submitted to: Journal of Invertebrate Pathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 1, 2011
Publication Date: January 5, 2012
Citation: Zhang, X., He, S., Evans, J.D., Pettis, J.S., Yin, G., Chen, Y. 2012. New evidence that deformed wing virus and black queen cell virus are multi-host pathogens. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology. 109(1):156-159.

Interpretive Summary: Black queen cell virus (BQCV) and Deformed wing virus (DWV) are the two most prevalent and common viruses in European honey bees and have been associated with honey bee colony declines. Here we provide the first evidence that BQCV and DWV can also attack wild species of dwarf honey bees and giant honey bees, both valuable natural pollinators in tropical forests. The genetic analysis indicated that genetic relatedness and the geographical proximity of host species likely play an important role in host range expansion. This research emphasizes the importance of viral disease control as an integrated part of biodiversity conservation efforts and is highly relevant for the development of virus management and disease control strategies. The information obtained from this study will be of interest to scientists in nature conservation and bee research societies, as well as the beekeeping community at large.

Technical Abstract: The host-range breadth of pathogens can have important consequences for pathogens’ long term evolution and virulence, and play critical roles in the emergence and spread of the new diseases. Black queen cell virus (BQCV) and Deformed wing virus (DWV) are the two most common and prevalent viruses in European honey bees, Apis mellifera. Here, we provide the first evidence that BQCV and DWV attack wild species of honey bees, Apis florea and A. dorsata. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that these viruses might have moved from A. mellifera to wild bee species and that genetic relatedness as well as the geographical proximity of host species likely play an important role in host range of the viruses. The information obtained from this present study can have important implication for understanding the population structure of bee virus as well as host-virus interactions.

Last Modified: 11/22/2014
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