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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT OF XYLELLA FASTIDIOSA (XF) AND OTHER EXOTIC AND INVASIVE DISEASES AND INSECT PESTS

Location: Crop Diseases, Pests and Genetics

Title: A Review of Managing Huanglongbing (Citrus Greening) in China Using a Nutritional Approach

Authors
item Xia, Y -
item Ouyang, G -
item Sequeira, Ronaldo
item Takeuchi, Y -
item Baez, Ignacio
item Chen, Jianchi

Submitted to: Plant Health Progress
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 27, 2011
Publication Date: October 3, 2011
Citation: Xia, Y., Ouyang, G., Sequeira, R.A., Takeuchi, Y., Baez, I., Chen, J. 2011. A Review of Managing Huanglongbing (Citrus Greening) in China Using a Nutritional Approach. Plant Health Progress. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1094/PHP-2010-1003-01-RV.

Interpretive Summary: Huanglongbing (HLB) is a destructive disease of citrus and is currently devastating the Florida citrus industry. Part of the HLB management program in Florida now involves use of supplemental nutrition. However, effectiveness of such practices remains to be evaluated. Nutrient management for mitigation of HLB has been practiced in China for many years. Data from literature review, field surveys, and interviews with Chinese scientists and growers are examined to determine success and limit of the nutritional approach for HLB management. The information is of value for U. S. citrus growers and researchers.

Technical Abstract: Supplemental nutrition as a part of huanglongbing (HLB) management is being adopted by an increasing number of citrus growers in Florida. The hope is that additional nutrition, especially micronutrients, will extend the productive life of HLB affected trees. Although the approach is recent in the United States, nutrient management for mitigation of HLB symptoms has been practiced in China for many years. Literature review, field surveys, and interviews with Chinese scientists and growers indicate that a nutritional approach, together with other cultural practices such as irrigation, can maintain grove productivity for years depending on the type of citrus species/cultivars, age of the trees, propagation method of the plants, and density of Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) populations, and other factors. Symptomatic mature pommelo (Citrus maxima Merr) and sweet orange (C. sinensis L. Osbeck) plants can commonly survive and maintain a acceptable level of productivity for an additional 4 to 5 years, even longer, assuming vigorous ACP control. Nevertheless, no consistent evidence supports the notion that nutrient management can maintain productivity of HLB-infected trees in the long term.

Last Modified: 9/1/2014
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