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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Development of a Decision-support System for the Ecologically-based Management of Cheatgrass- and Medusahead-infested Rangeland

Location: Range and Meadow Forage Management Research

Title: Species performance: the relationship between nutrient availability, life history traits, and stress

Author
item James, Jeremy

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: April 1, 2011
Publication Date: March 21, 2012
Citation: James, J.J. 2012. Species performance: the relationship between nutrient availability, life history traits, and stress. In: Monaco, T.A, Sheley, R.A., editors. Invasive Plant Ecology and Management: Linking Processes to Practice. Wallingford, UK: CABI Publishing. p.142-153.

Interpretive Summary: The role soil nutrient availability plays in our ability to restore invasive plant dominated systems is not as straightforward as it initially appears. The objectives of this chapter are to: 1) Examine current paradigms and assumptions about how nutrient availability influences the relative performance of invasive and native plants. 2) Develop the argument that the influence of nutrient availability on species performance is mediated by life history traits and stressors such as drought and herbivory. 3) Describe how these principles that determine species performance in different nutrient environments can be used to develop more effective invasive plant management strategies.

Technical Abstract: The role soil nutrient availability plays in our ability to restore invasive plant dominated systems is not as straightforward as it initially appears. The objectives of this chapter are to: 1) Examine current paradigms and assumptions about how nutrient availability influences the relative performance of invasive and native plants. 2) Develop the argument that the influence of nutrient availability on species performance is mediated by life history traits and stressors such as drought and herbivory. 3) Describe how these principles that determine species performance in different nutrient environments can be used to develop more effective invasive plant management strategies.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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