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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BITING ARTHROPODS: SENSORY ECOLOGY AND SURVEILLANCE

Location: Mosquito and Fly Research Unit

Title: Evaluation of propane combustion traps for collection of Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) in southern Israel.

Authors
item Kline, Daniel
item Hogsette, Jerome
item Muller, Gunter -

Submitted to: Journal of Vector Ecology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 19, 2011
Publication Date: March 11, 2011
Citation: Kline, D.L., Hogsette, Jr, J.A., Muller, G.C. 2011. Evaluation of propane combustion traps for collection of Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) in southern Israel. Journal of Vector Ecology. 36(1):S166-S171.

Interpretive Summary: Traps used for mosquitoes can possibly used to capture phlebotomine sand flies as well, but little testing has been done. Traps powered by propane could be extremely useful because most produce their own carbon dioxide (CO2), which can increase the number of sand flies captured. Studies indicated that 7 of the 11 mosquito trap models tested could be used for capturing female sand flies and might be suitable substitutes for either the CO2-baited or unbaited light traps currently used for adult sand fly surveillance . Models producing electricity to power their fans have a logistical advantage in field operations.

Technical Abstract: Traps used for mosquitoes can possibly used to capture phlebotomine sand flies as well, but little testing has been done. Traps powered by propane could be extremely useful because most produce their own carbon dioxide (CO2), which can increase the number of sand flies captured. Scientists at the USDA-CMAVE worked cooperatively with scientists at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel, to evaluate 11 commercial propane combustion trap models to determine their efficacy for catching male and female Phlebotomus papatasi. All but 4 trap models attracted significantly more females than males. This is important because only the females are blood feeders. Several models might be suitable substitutes for either CO2-baited or unbaited light traps for adult sand fly surveillance. A positive feature is that traps can operate 24/7 for ca. 20 days on 1 propane tank. Models producing electricity to power their fans have a logistical advantage in field operations.

Last Modified: 7/25/2014
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