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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTERVENTIONS TO REDUCE FOODBORNE PATHOGENS IN SWINE AND CATTLE

Location: Food and Feed Safety Research

Title: Potential environmental benefits of feed additives and other strategies for ruminant production

Authors
item Tedeschi, L -
item Callaway, Todd
item Muir, J -
item Anderson, Robin

Submitted to: Revista Brasileira de Zootecnia
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 1, 2011
Publication Date: July 15, 2011
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/57245
Citation: Tedeschi, L.O., Callaway, T.R., Muir, J.P., Anderson, R.C. 2011. Potential environmental benefits of feed additives and other strategies for ruminant production. Revista Brasileira de Zootecnia. 40:291-309.

Interpretive Summary: Environmental pollution and food safety are two important concerns that impact ruminant production around the world. The growing public concern over chemical residues in animal-derived foods and threats of antibiotic-resistant bacteria have renewed interest in exploring safer alternatives to chemical antibiotic feed additives in ruminant livestock. There are several feed additives and strategies that can be used or combined with current production systems to decrease the carbon footprint, specifically methane (CH4) contribution of ruminant production to the environment. Because the variety of feed additives utilized have different mechanisms of action in the rumen, they might be able to act positively on ruminal feed fermentation and ruminant performance when used separately or together. Their modes of action include altering the fermentation metabolic pathways and/or modifying the microbial ecosystem. Their efficacy may depend on the type of feed, physiological status of the animal, and animal species.

Technical Abstract: Environmental pollution and food safety are two important concerns that impact ruminant production around the world. The growing public concern over chemical residues in animal-derived foods and threats of antibiotic-resistant bacteria have renewed interest in exploring safer alternatives to chemical feed additives (i.e. antibiotics) in ruminant livestock, and increases in the concentration of greenhouse gases (GHG), mainly nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4), in the atmosphere has triggered concerns regarding the contributions of modern animal production techniques on global warming and environmental pollution.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014