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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGY, EPIDEMIOLOGY, PATHOGENESIS, AND VECTOR SPECIFICITY OF SUGARBEET AND VEGETABLE VIRUSES Title: Impact of curly top host plants on accumulation, competitiveness, and durability of curtovirus species.

Author
item Wintermantel, William

Submitted to: American Society of Sugar Beet Technologists
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: May 1, 2011
Publication Date: June 1, 2011
Repository URL: http://www.assbt-proceedings.org/ASSBT2011Proceedings/Entomology%20and%20Plant%20Pathology/Wintermantel.pdf
Citation: Wintermantel, W.M. 2011. Impact of curly top host plants on accumulation, competitiveness, and durability of curtovirus species. American Society of Sugar Beet Technologists. Online.

Interpretive Summary: Curly top disease, caused by viruses in the genus, Curtovirus, has affected sugarbeet production throughout much of the West for over a century; however, over that period the viruses responsible for causing the disease have changed. The two curly top virus species currently affecting production, Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV) and Beet mild curly top virus (BMCTV) have not always been the dominant forms, and in some areas new curly top virus species have been identified affecting chili pepper production, although to date the new species have been identified in sugarbeet. In order to identify factors that drive the emergence of new curly top virus species, as well as determine what factors cause a variant to outcompete traditional forms, studies were undertaken to examine virus accumulation and competition among common weed and crop hosts throughout the western United States. Taq-Man probes were developed to selectively amplify distinct curtovirus species by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Several weed and crop hosts of curly top viruses were inoculated with BSCTV and BMCTV in both single and mixed infections under controlled conditions, to determine efficiency of accumulation in each host plant species, individually, as well as which virus dominates during mixed infections. Results indicated variation in accumulation by host species. Continuing studies are directed toward clarifying performance of less common or new species in these hosts, and whether the new species can out-compete BSCTV and BMCTV in sugarbeet and other crop hosts. This will determine the potential for the new species to become significant agricultural threats.

Technical Abstract: Curly top disease, caused by viruses in the genus, Curtovirus, has affected sugarbeet production throughout much of the West for over a century; however, over that period the viruses responsible for causing the disease have changed. The two curly top virus species currently affecting production, Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV) and Beet mild curly top virus (BMCTV) have not always been the dominant forms, and in some areas new curly top virus species have been identified affecting chili pepper production, although to date the new species have been identified in sugarbeet. In order to identify factors that drive the emergence of new curly top virus species, as well as determine what factors cause a variant to outcompete traditional forms, studies were undertaken to examine virus accumulation and competition among common weed and crop hosts throughout the western United States. Taq-Man probes were developed to selectively amplify distinct curtovirus species by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Several weed and crop hosts of curly top viruses were inoculated with BSCTV and BMCTV in both single and mixed infections under controlled conditions, to determine efficiency of accumulation in each host plant species, individually, as well as which virus dominates during mixed infections. Results indicated variation in accumulation by host species. Continuing studies are directed toward clarifying performance of less common or new species in these hosts, and whether the new species can out-compete BSCTV and BMCTV in sugarbeet and other crop hosts. This will determine the potential for the new species to become significant agricultural threats.

Last Modified: 11/26/2014