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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Technologies for Detecting and Determining the Bioavailability of Bacterial Toxins

Location: Foodborne Toxin Detection and Prevention

Title: Cd154 As a Potential Early Molecular Biomarker for Rapid Quantification Analysis of Active Staphylococcus Enterotoxin A

Authors
item Rasooly, Reuven
item Hernlem, Bradley

Submitted to: FEMS Immunology and Medical Microbiology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 27, 2011
Publication Date: November 22, 2011
Citation: Rasooly, R., Hernlem, B.J. 2011. CD154 as a potential early molecular biomarker for rapid quantification analysis of active Staphylococcus enterotoxin A. FEMS Immunology and Medical Microbiology. 64(2):169-174.

Interpretive Summary: Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) produced by bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, cause food poisoning. In our previous study, we developed a non-radioactive assay that can detect active SEA in food in 48h. The present study describes that short term (6h) exposure of CD4+ T-cells to SEA induces differential expression of T cell surface receptor CD154 in a time and dose dependent manner. We demonstrate that expression of CD154 can be used for rapid detection of active SEA in food items that previously caused SEA outbreaks.

Technical Abstract: Staphylococcus aureus is a major bacterial pathogen producing a group of twenty-one enterotoxins (SEs). These enterotoxins have two separate but related biological activities, They cause gastroenteritis, and they function as a superantigens that activate large numbers of T cells. In the current study, we demonstrate for the first time that short term ex vivo exposure of primary naïve CD4+ T-cells to SEA induces the differential expression of the T cell surface receptor CD154 in a time and dose dependent manner. In addition we show that SEA strongly induces CD154 protein expression in CD4+ T-cells, and also induces higher splenocyte cell proliferation compared to SEB. We also demonstrate that expression of CD154 can be used for rapid detection of active SEA in food.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
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