Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: EVALUATION OF MATERNAL AND PATERNAL GERMPLASM FOR INCREASING EFFICIENCY OF SHEEP IN WESTERN RANGELAND PRODUCTION SYSTEMS

Location: Range Sheep Production Efficiency Research

Title: Supplemental branched-chain amino acids improve performance and immune response of newly-received feedlot calves

Authors
item Carter, Boone -
item Mathis, Clay -
item Duff, Glenn -
item TAYLOR, JOSHUA
item Taylor, Katie -
item Graham, Brock -
item Hall, Laun -
item Allen, J -
item Hallford, Dennis -
item Loest, Clint -

Submitted to: Western Section of Animal Science Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: April 1, 2011
Publication Date: June 17, 2011
Citation: Carter, B.H., Mathis, C.P., Duff, G.C., Taylor, J.B., Taylor, K.M., Graham, B.C., Hall, L.W., Allen, J.D., Hallford, D.M., Loest, C.A. 2011. Supplemental branched-chain amino acids improve performance and immune response of newly-received feedlot calves. Western Section of Animal Science Proceedings. 62:321-324.

Interpretive Summary: Transportation and translocation stresses predispose newly-received feedlot calves to infection, which may increase the metabolic demand for branched-chain amino acids (BCAA). The objective of this experiment was to determine the effect of supplemental BCAA on growth and health of newly-received feedlot steers. Our results demonstrated that BCAA supplementation may improve the adaptive immune response and efficiency of gain in newly-received feedlot calves.

Technical Abstract: Supplemental branched-chain AA (BCAA) improved N balance of steers during a simulated pathogen challenge. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of supplemental BCAA on growth and health of newly-received feedlot steers. Steers (n = 120; initial BW = 376 ± 5 kg) were blocked by BW and assigned to 12 pens and 2 treatments in a randomized complete block design. Treatments were no supplemental AA (CON) and rumen-protected BCAA, which was top-dressed to a receiving diet that was fed for 28 d after initial processing (d 0). On d 0 and 14, steers were vaccinated against ovalbumin (OVA). On d 0, 14, 28, and 56, blood samples and BW were collected. Morbidity was recorded throughout the experiment. No BCAA × day interactions (P = 0.29) were detected for serum anti-OVA IgG, insulin, white blood cell count, or plasma Ile, Leu, or Val. Serum anti-OVA IgG was greater (P = 0.02) for BCAA vs CON steers. Serum insulin and plasma Ile, Leu, and Val concentrations were not different between treatments (P = 0.30). White blood cell count was not different (P = 0.56) between treatments, but differential proportion of neutrophils among total white blood cells was greater (P < 0.05) for BCAA than CON. From d 0 to 14, DMI, ADG, and G:F were not different between treatments (P = 0.44). From d 15 to 28, DMI was less (P < 0.05), and ADG and G:F tended to be greater (P = 0.11) for steers fed BCAA than CON. From d 29 to 56, DMI was not different (P = 0.50), and ADG and G:F were greater (P < 0.05) for BCAA than CON steers. From d 57 to finish, DMI, ADG, and G:F of steers were not different between treatments (P = 0.60). Overall, DMI and ADG were not different (P = 0.25), and G:F was greater (P = 0.05) for steers supplemented with BCAA compared to CON. Morbidity was not different (P = 0.99). Transportation and translocation stresses predispose newly-received feedlot calves to infection, which may increase the metabolic demand for BCAA. Our results demonstrate that BCAA supplementation may improve the adaptive immune response and efficiency of gain in feedlot receiving steers.

Last Modified: 7/25/2014