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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGY, EPIDEMIOLOGY, PATHOGENESIS, AND VECTOR SPECIFICITY OF SUGARBEET AND VEGETABLE VIRUSES

Location: Crop Improvement and Protection Research

Title: Differential effects of hosts plants on accumulation, competition and transmission of curtoviruses from single and mixed infections.

Author
item WINTERMANTEL, WILLIAM

Submitted to: American Phytopathological Society Annual Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 30, 2011
Publication Date: June 1, 2011
Citation: Wintermantel, W.M. 2011. Differential effects of hosts plants on accumulation, competition and transmission of curtoviruses from single and mixed infections.. American Phytopathological Society Annual Meeting. Online.

Technical Abstract: Curly top disease, caused by viruses in the genus, Curtovirus, has impacted western US agriculture for over a century; however, over that period the viruses responsible for the disease have changed. The two most abundant curtovirus species today, Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV) and Beet mild curly top virus (BMCTV) have not always been the dominant forms, and in some areas of the southwestern US new curtovirus species have been identified. To identify factors that drive the emergence of new species, as well as determine what factors cause a variant to become dominant, studies were undertaken to examine virus accumulation, competition and transmission among common weed and crop curtovirus hosts. Single and mixed infections of BSCTV and BMCTV were established in several weed and crop hosts, to determine efficiency of accumulation in each host plant species individually, as well as which virus dominates during mixed infections. Results indicated differential accumulation of each virus depending on host plant, and shifts in accumulation patterns during mixed infection. Transmission studies demonstrated variation in transmission efficiency of each virus among host plants, and evaluation of the relationship between source plant virus concentration and transmission efficiency is ongoing. Results add to the knowledge of factors driving emergence and dominance among curtoviruses and contributes to overall knowledge of curtovirus epidemiology.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014