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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CHEMICAL MODIFICATION OF COTTON FOR VALUE ADDED APPLICATIONS

Location: Cotton Chemistry and Utilization Research

Title: Development for phosphorus-nitrogen containing flame retardant compound and its textile application

Authors
item Nguyen, Thach-Mien
item Chang, Sechin
item Condon, Brian

Submitted to: Proceedings of American Chemical Society National Meeting
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: February 23, 2011
Publication Date: March 27, 2011
Citation: Nguyen, T.D., Chang, S., Condon, B.D. 2011. Development for phosphorus-nitrogen containing flame retardant compound and its textile application. Proceedings of American Chemical Society National Meeting. 46(1):5-6.

Technical Abstract: A novel flame retardant Diethyl 4-methylpiperazin-1-ylphosphoramidate, CN-3 containing phosphorous and nitrogen has been prepared. Its chemical structure was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (1H, 13C, 31P NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), and elemental analysis. Print cloth and twill fabrics were treated with CN-3 to achieve different levels of add-on (7-22 % add-ons for print cloth and 3-18% add-ons for twill). Thermal degradation in nitrogen atmosphere of the treated fabrics showed that the decomposition occurred ~132 and 138ºC with 23 and 22% char residues at 600ºC for 22 and 18% add-ons of treated print cloth and twill, respectively. When the treated print cloth and twill fabric samples were tested using the vertical flame test (ASTM D6413-08), we observed that the ignited fabrics self extinguished and left behind a streak of char. Treated higher add-ons fabrics were neither consumed by flame, nor produced glowing ambers upon self extinguishing. Limiting oxygen index (LOI, ASTM 2863-09) was utilized to determine the effectiveness of the flame retardant on the treated fabrics. LOI values increased from ~12 and 18% oxygen in nitrogen for untreated print cloth and twill fabrics to maximum of 28 and 31% for the highest add-ons of print cloth and twill, respectively. Furthermore, FT-IR and SEM were employed to characterize the chemical structure on the treated fabrics as well as the surface morphology of char areas of treated and untreated fabrics.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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