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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BITING ARTHROPODS: INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT

Location: Mosquito and Fly Research Unit

Title: Longevity and efficacy of bifenthrin treatment on desert-pattern U.S. military camouflage netting against mosquitoes in a hot-arid environment

Authors
item BRITCH, SETH
item LINTHICUM, KENNETH
item Wynn, Willard -
item ALDRIDGE, ROBERT
item Walker, Todd -
item Farooq, Muhammad -
item Dunford, James -
item Smith, Vincent -
item Robinson, Cathy -
item Lothrop, Branka -
item Snelling, Melissa -
item Gutierrez, Arturo -
item Wittie, Jeremy -
item White, Greg -

Submitted to: Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 6, 2011
Publication Date: September 1, 2011
Citation: Britch, S.C., Linthicum, K., Wynn, W.W., Aldridge, R.L., Walker, T.W., Farooq, M., Dunford, J.C., Smith, V.L., Robinson, C.A., Lothrop, B.B., Snelling, M., Gutierrez, A., Wittie, J., White, G. 2011. Longevity and efficacy of bifenthrin treatment on desert-pattern U.S. military camouflage netting against mosquitoes in a hot-arid environment. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association. 27(3):272-279.

Interpretive Summary: United States military operations in hot arid regions of the Middle East and Africa bring troops, Department of Defense (DoD) civilians, and civilian contractors in contact with mosquito and sand fly vectors of disease. The DoD system of protection against these vectors include educational programs, habitat modification, use of US Environmental Protection Agency approved insect repellents such as DEET on exposed skin, permethrin treatment of clothing, ultra-low volume (ULV) aerosol dispersal of pesticides, chemical treatment of mosquito larval habitat, and spray application of residual pesticides on a range of structures. However, deployed US troops and civilians continue to contact these vector insects as well as abundant populations of nuisance insects such as filth flies, and there is a need to expand the DoD system of vector and pest insect reduction. A recent study showed that residual insecticide treatment of woodland pattern US military camouflage netting was long lasting and effective at reducing mosquitoes. Residual treatments consist of spraying specially formulated insecticides onto a surface and allowing the chemical to dry; once dry the residual treatment forms a barrier that is toxic to insects such as mosquitoes and flies that contact it. Though the prior study showed that residual pesticides on woodland camouflage netting was effective, most camouflage netting currently used in US military operations is a desert pattern material distinctly different in composition than the woodland pattern. In this study we show that desert pattern camouflage netting may also be effectively treated with residual insecticide and provide protection against mosquitoes in a hot-arid environment for at least 2 months.

Technical Abstract: Personnel deployed in support of US military operations will benefit from additions to the current Department of Defense pest management system. A recent study showed that residual insecticide treatment of woodland pattern US military camouflage netting was long lasting and effective at reducing mosquitoes. However, most camouflage netting currently used in US military operations is a desert pattern material distinctly different in composition than the woodland pattern. In this study we show that desert pattern camouflage netting may also be effectively treated with residual insecticide and provide protection against mosquitoes in a hot-arid environment for at least 2 months.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014