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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Integrated Aquatic Animal Health Strategies

Location: Aquatic Animal Health Research

Title: An in vitro screening method to evaluate chemicals as potential chemotherapeutants to control Aeromonas hydrophila infection in channel catfish

Authors
item Wei Pridgeon, Yuping
item Klesius, Phillip
item Mu, Xingjiang -
item Song, Lin -

Submitted to: Journal of Applied Microbiology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 6, 2011
Publication Date: June 16, 2011
Repository URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10113/55610
Citation: Wei Pridgeon, Y., Klesius, P.H., Mu, X., Song, L. 2011. An in vitro screening method to evaluate chemicals as potential chemotherapeutants to control Aeromonas hydrophila infection in channel catfish. Journal of Applied Microbiology. 111:114-124.

Interpretive Summary: Using catfish gill cells and four chemicals, the feasibility of using an in vitro screening method to identify potential effective chemotherapeutants was evaluated in this study. In vitro screening results revealed that, at concentration of 100 mg/L, hydrogen peroxide was the only chemical tested that was able to completely abolish the attachment and invasion of bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila to catfish gill cells. In vivo virulence studies using live channel catfish through bath immersion confirmed that hydrogen peroxide was the only chemical tested that was able to significantly reduce the mortality (from 90 or 100% to 0 or 20%) caused by A. hydrophila infections. The in vitro screening method using catfish gill cells G1B could be used to initially identify potential effective chemotherapeutants to control bacterial infections.

Technical Abstract: Using catfish gill cells G1B and four chemicals (hydrogen peroxide, sodium chloride, potassium permanganate, and D-mannose), the feasibility of using an in vitro screening method to identify potential effective chemotherapeutants was evaluated in this study. In vitro screening results revealed that, at concentration of 100 mg/L, H2O2 was the only chemical tested that was able to completely abolish the attachment and invasion of A. hydrphila to catfish gill cells. In vivo virulence studies using live channel catfish through bath immersion confirmed that H2O2 was the only chemical tested that was able to significantly (P<0.001) reduce the mortality (from 90 or 100% to 0 or 20%) caused by A. hydrophila infections. The in vitro screening method using catfish gill cells G1B could be used to initially identify potential effective chemotherapeutants to control A. hydrophila. An in vitro screening method using catfish gill cells to identify potential effective chemotherapeutants described here will cut cost in research compared to the method of using live fish to screen lead compounds for fish disease control.

Last Modified: 8/19/2014
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