Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SUSTAINING RURAL ECONOMIES THROUGH NEW WATER MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGIES Title: 2010 North Plains Research Field 12-200 Limited Irrigation Corn Production Study

Authors
item Marek, Thomas -
item Xu, Wenwei -
item Bean, Brent -
item Michels, Gerald -
item Amosson, Steve -
item Moorhead, Jerry -
item Kenny, Nicholas -
item Sweeten, John -
item Howell, Terry
item Gowda, Prasanna
item Colaizzi, Paul

Submitted to: Scientific and Technical Review
Publication Type: Experiment Station
Publication Acceptance Date: January 28, 2011
Publication Date: January 28, 2011
Citation: Marek, T., Xu, W., Bean, B., Michels, G., Amosson, S., Moorhead, J., Kenny, N., Sweeten, J., Howell, T.A., Gowda, P., Colaizzi, P.D. 2011. 2010 North Plains Research Field 12-200 Limited Irrigation Corn Production Study. Publication AREC 2011-2, January 28, 2011. Version 1.01. 2011 CDROM.

Interpretive Summary: The North Plains Groundwater Conservation District (NPGCD) in the Texas High Plains started a demonstration program to illustrate if the region could produce 200 bushels per acre of corn using just 12 inches of irrigation water (named the 12-200 Project). This report is a summary of the first year's research and demonstration (2010) of technologies to achieve this goal for research conducted at the Texas AgriLife Research North Plains Research Field at Etter, Texas. The research and demonstration included three commercial corn hybrids under four seedings with irrigation management to achieve the 12-200 goal. Results generally confirmed previous results on the corn production function (i.e., yield vs. water) with two of the selected varieties failing to meet the desired goal. In 2010, insect pressure was light and no insect controls were required. The 2010 season received above normal rainfall in the early to mid-season periods and delayed planting. The 2010 corn crop was able to utilize 4.7 inches of soil water from the 10.1 inches of effective rainfall along with pre-planting stored soil water. A demonstration of the research was held on August 25, 2010, to allow regional producers and the NPGCD board of directors to see and discuss the demonstration project.

Technical Abstract: The North Plains Groundwater Conservation District (NPGCD) in the Texas High Plains embarked on a demonstration program to illustrate if the region could produce 200 bushels and acres of corn using just 12 inches of irrigation water (named the 12-200 Project). This report is a summary of the first year's research and demonstration (2010) of technologies to achieve this goal for research conducted at the Texas AgriLife Research North Plains Research Field (NPRF) at Etter, Texas. The research and demonstration included three commercial corn hybrids produced under a center pivot sprinkler using four seeding densities from 20,000 plants/ac to 32,000 plants/ac in 4,000 plants/ac increments and irrigation management designed to meet the 12-200 goals. Results generally confirmed previous results on corn water productivity (e.g., production function) with two of the selected varieties failing to meet the desired goal. In 2010, although insect pressure was monitored, there wasn't a need for any insect control required. The 2010 season at the NPRF received above normal rainfall in the early to mid-season periods and delayed planting. The 2010 corn crop was able to utilize 4.7 inches of soil water from the 10.1 inches of effective rainfall along with pre-planting stored soil water. A field day was held on August 25, 2010, to demonstrate the field demonstration to regional producers and the NPGCD board of directors.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page