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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DISCOVERY AND CHARACTERIZATION OF PLANT PATHOGENS FOR BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF INVASIVE WEEDS FROM THEIR NATIVE RANGE

Location: Foreign Disease-Weed Science

Title: Biological control studies on Convolvulus arvensis L. with fungal pathogens

Authors
item Tunali, Berna -
item Kansu, Bayram -
item BERNER, DANA

Submitted to: Journal of Turkish Phytopathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 1, 2011
Publication Date: December 1, 2011
Citation: Tunali, B., Kansu, B., Berner, D.K. 2011. Biological control studies on Convolvulus arvensis L. with fungal pathogens. Journal of Turkish Phytopathology. 38:1-8.

Interpretive Summary: Field bindweed is a troublesome weed in many agricultural areas of the world, including Turkey and the USA. Some fungi were identified with potential to control bindweed and some of them could be used as biological herbicides. In the summers of 2008, 2009 and 2010 diseased bindweed plants were collected from different sites of Amasya, Ankara, Corum, Samsun and Tokat provinces in Turkey. Fungi were collected from diseased plants and the fungi were identified based on their characteristics. Bindweed plants were sprayed with spores of each fungus. Dates were recorded for each fungus when disease became visible, and the proportions of diseased leaves, out of the total number of leaves, on each sprayed plant were recorded. Three fungi, Stagonospora convolvuli, Colletotrichum linicola, and Myrothecium verrucaria, produced the highest levels of disease on the sprayed plants. Plant heights of bindweed were the shortest following spraying with Colletotrichum linicola and a Phoma. These results indicate that, Colletotrichum linicola seems potentially effective, and field tests alone, or in combination with Stagonospora convolvuli, should be performed.

Technical Abstract: Field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis) is a perennial, noxious weed in Europe and in many agricultural areas of the world, including Turkey. Some pathogenic fungi were identified with potential to control bindweed and some of them could be used as mycoherbicide components. In the summers of 2008, 2009 and 2010 diseased bindweed plants were collected from different sites of Amasya, Ankara, Corum, Samsun and Tokat provinces. Pathogenic fungi were isolated from diseased plants and they were identified based on their morphological characteristics. Bindweed plants were grown in a climatically controlled room to the 4 to 5-leaf stage; plants were inoculated with an aqueous spore suspension of each fungus at various densities specified. Spores were sprayed until runoff onto bindweed plants with a hand sprayer. Dates were recorded for each isolate when disease lesions became visible, and the proportions of diseased leaves, out of the total number of leaves, on each inoculated plant were recorded. These data were analyzed with SAS software and an analysis of covariance model. Stagonospora convolvuli, Colletotrichum linicola, and Myrothecium verrucaria produced the highest level of diseases on the inoculated test plants. Plant heights of C. arvensis were the shortest following inoculation with C. linicola and a Phoma sp. These results indicate that, C. linicola seems potentially effective, and field tests alone or in combination with S. convolvuli should be performed.

Last Modified: 8/19/2014
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