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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF INSECTS AND MICROORGANISMS TO PREVENT MYCOTOXIN CONTAMINATION

Location: Foodborne Toxin Detection and Prevention

Title: Impact of Kairomones on Moth Pest Management: Pear Ester and the Codling Moth

Author
item Light, Douglas

Submitted to: American Chemical Society National Meeting
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 4, 2011
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Codling moth (CM) is the major pest of apples, pears, and walnuts worldwide. Our focus is to develop novel, species-specific monitoring and control systems based on host-plant odors, kairomones. In 1998 ‘pear ester’ (PE), ethyl (2E, 4Z)-2,4-decadienoate, was identified as a powerful kairomonal attractant of both male and female CM adults and larvae. Through 11-years of cooperative research, USDA-ARS and Trécé, Inc. have developed multiple tactics using PE to improve both population monitoring and mating disruption (MD) of adults and also insecticidal control of larvae. Supporting the axiom ‘better attractants make better disruptants,’ PE was shown to increase attraction of males to pheromone then demonstrated to also enhance MD. Application of PE to leaf surfaces elicits larval attraction, arrestment and prolonged wandering, thereby increasing exposure time of larvae and the efficacy of insecticides. Integrated tactics using PE are making an impact on CM management and judicious use of pesticides.

Technical Abstract: Codling moth (CM) is the major pest of apples, pears, and walnuts worldwide. Our focus is to develop novel, species-specific monitoring and control systems based on host-plant odors, kairomones. In 1998 ‘pear ester’ (PE), ethyl (2E, 4Z)-2,4-decadienoate, was identified as a powerful kairomonal attractant of both male and female CM adults and larvae. Through 11-years of cooperative research, USDA-ARS and Trécé, Inc. have developed multiple tactics using PE to improve both population monitoring and mating disruption (MD) of adults and also insecticidal control of larvae. Supporting the axiom ‘better attractants make better disruptants,’ PE was shown to increase attraction of males to pheromone then demonstrated to also enhance MD. Application of PE to leaf surfaces elicits larval attraction, arrestment and prolonged wandering, thereby increasing exposure time of larvae and the efficacy of insecticides. Integrated tactics using PE are making an impact on CM management and judicious use of pesticides.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014
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