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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: REDUCING SOYBEAN YIELD LOSSES THROUGH GENETIC IMPROVEMENT

Location: Crop Genetics Research Unit

Title: Analysis of Fusarium populations in a soybean field under different fertilization management by real-time quantitative PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

Authors
item Wei, Wei -
item Xu, Yan-Li -
item Li, Shuxian
item Lui, Jin-Bo -
item Han, Xiao-Zeng -
item Li, Wen-Bin -
item Ji, Pingsheng -

Submitted to: Journal of Plant Pathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 26, 2011
Publication Date: March 26, 2012
Citation: Wei, W., Xu, Y., Li, S., Lui, J., Han, X., Li, W., Ji, P. 2012. Analysis of Fusarium populations in a soybean field under different fertilization management by real-time quantitative PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Journal of Plant Pathology. 94(1):119-126.

Interpretive Summary: Diseases incited by Fusarium species reduce the quality of agricultural products, cause significant yield lose, and are among the most difficult diseases to be controlled. Fertilization management could affect soil chemical composition directly resulting in a change of biological activity of population structure of soil microorganisms. Fertilization could also affect root exudates causing an indirect affect on the soil microbial community. However, information about the effect of fertilization on Fusarium in soil is lacking. In this study, field trials were conducted to determine the effect of different fertilization treatments on the amount and types of Fusarium in soil, and the potential role in disease management. The field was under soybean-wheat-corn rotation located in the black soil (Udic Mollisol) region of northeast China. The treatments included no fertilizer, chemical fertilizers nitrogen and phosphorus, and chemical nitrogen and phosphorus combined with pig manure. Analysis of the amount of Fusarium DNA in the soil after different fertilization treatments showed that the organic matter in the treatment of chemical nitrogen and phosphorus combined with pig manure increased molds in soil. It appeared that this treatment is a promising method for controlling disease caused by Fusarium.

Technical Abstract: The abundance and population structure of Fusarium spp. in field soils were assessed to determine the effect of different fertilization treatments on soil microbial community and potential role in disease management. The field was under soybean-wheat-corn rotation located in the black soil (Udic Mollisol) region of northeast China, with a long-term application of different fertilization treatments for 17 years. These treatments included no fertilizer (NF), chemical fertilizers nitrogen and phosphorus (NP), and chemical nitrogen and phosphorus combined with pig manure (NPM). Soil samples were taken at the seedling stage of soybean and two molecular approaches, real-time quantitative PCR (QPCR) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), were used to study population structure of Fusarium spp. in the soils. Total genomic DNA of Fusarium from NF, NP and NPM treatments were 21.6, 40.6 and 514.5 pg per gram of soil as determined by the QPCR analyses. The quantity of Fusarium genomic DNA in NPM treatment was significantly higher (P < 0.01) than in the other two treatments. According to the DGGE analysis, the NPM and NP treatments showed a significantly (P < 0.05) higher diversity index (H) and a significantly (P < 0.05) lower dominance index (C) than the NF treatment. Principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that the effect of NPM on soil population structure of Fusarium spp. was more obvious. The organic matter in the NPM treatment increased the abundance and diversity of Fusarium spp. in soil. Fertilization treatments might play a role in plant disease suppression by significantly affecting Fusarium populations in the soil.

Last Modified: 4/19/2014
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