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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IPM TECHNOLOGIES FOR SUBTROPICAL INSECT PESTS Title: A new method for short-term rearing of psyllids and for collecting their honeydew excretions

Authors
item Ammar, Eldesouky
item Hall, David

Submitted to: Florida Entomologist
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 21, 2010
Publication Date: July 12, 2011
Citation: Ammar, E., Hall, D.G. 2011. A new method for short-term rearing of citrus psyllids and for collecting their honeydew excretions. Florida Entomologist. 94:340-342.

Interpretive Summary: Using whole citrus plants for rearing citrus psyllids for biological studies and for studying vector relations of the huanglongbing (citrus greening) disease takes considerable space, time and other resources. We have developed a new and simpler method for short-term rearing of the Asian citrus psyllid using detached mature or young citrus leaves in conical polypropylene tubes.

Technical Abstract: Using whole citrus seedlings/plants for rearing or maintenance of single or small groups of citrus psyllids for biological studies and for studying vector relations of the huanglongbing (citrus greening) disease takes considerable space, time and other resources. We have developed a new and simpler method for short-term rearing of the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) Diaphorina citri using detached mature or young citrus leaves in conical 50-ml polypropylene tubes. Young adults and nymphs of ACP reared for 1-4 weeks by this method were observed feeding and excreting regularly. Survival of young adults was 89, 80 and 75 percent after 2, 3 and 4 weeks, respectively, on detached mature mid-size leaves. Survival and adult emergence of 2nd to 3rd-instar nymphs were significantly higher in those kept for one week on partially expanded young leaves on detached terminal shoots, compared to those kept for the same period on detached mature mid-size leaves. Additionally, honeydew excretion droplets of ACP accumulated and can be easily collected from the conical bottom of the rearing tubes. This new method for short-term rearing and excretion-collecting for citrus psyllids can save time, space and other resources and enhance various studies on the biology, management and pathogen-vector interactions of ACP and other citrus psyllids.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014
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