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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: PHYSIOLOGICAL AND GENETIC BASIS OF POSTHARVEST QUALITY, DISEASE CONTROL, AND PHYTONUTRIENT CONTENT OF SELECTED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES Title: Classical genetics and traditional breeding

Authors
item King, Stephen -
item Davis, Angela
item Wehner, Todd -

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: January 5, 2011
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Cucurbit crops (watermelon, cantaloupe, cucumber, squash, and pumpkin) simultaneously bestow upon a plant breeder several advantages and disadvantages. As pointed out by Whitaker and Bohn (1950), these crops are easily grown typically offer plenty of large flowers to work with over a fairly long period of time. Probably the greatest disadvantage is that cucurbit crops tend to be large plants that require abundant field space for proper examination of most agronomically important traits. Adding to the disadvantages, cucurbit crops must be hand pollinated to prevent cross pollination, and since most selections are for fruit qualities, pollinations must be made before selection of desired fruit characteristics. Consequently, our genetic understanding has lagged behind other crops that can be more easily self pollinated and properly evaluated in a smaller area, such as tomato. The following is a review of what is published on watermelon classical breeding and mapping efforts.

Technical Abstract: Cucurbit crops simultaneously bestow upon the breeder several advantages and disadvantages. As pointed out by Whitaker and Bohn (1950), cucurbit crops are easily grown with indeterminant plants which typically offer plenty of large flowers to work with over a fairly long period of time. Probably the greatest disadvantage is that cucurbit crops tend to be large plants that require abundant field space for proper examination of most agronomically important traits. Adding to the disadvantages, cucurbit crops must be hand pollinated to prevent cross pollination, and since most selections are for fruit qualities, pollinations must be made before selection of desired phenotype. Consequently, our genetic understanding has lagged behind other crops that can be more easily self pollinated and properly evaluated in a smaller area, such as tomato. The following is a review of what is published on watermelon classical breeding and mapping efforts.

Last Modified: 4/23/2014
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