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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: POISONING OF LIVESTOCK BY VARIOUS LARKSPUR SPECIES (DELPHINIUM) Title: The effects of methyllycaconitine on the response of TE-671 cells to acetylcholine and epibatidine

Authors
item Green, Benedict
item Welch, Kevin
item Cook, Daniel
item Gardner, Dale

Submitted to: FASEB Letters
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 3, 2011
Publication Date: March 18, 2011
Repository URL: http://www.fasebj.org/cgi/content/meeting_abstract/25/1_MeetingAbstracts/798.5
Citation: Green, B.T., Welch, K.D., Cook, D., Gardner, D.R. 2011. The effects of methyllycaconitine on the response of TE-671 cells to acetylcholine and epibatidine. FASEB Journal. 25: 798.5.

Technical Abstract: Methyllycaconitine (MLA) is a norditerpenoid alkaloid found in Delphinium spp., and is a potent and selective antagonist of a7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Plants with high concentrations of MLA are responsible for many livestock poisonings in the Intermountain West of the United States of America. The objective of this study was to characterize the actions of MLA on the response of TE-671 cells to two nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists, acetylcholine, and epibatidine. The actions of MLA were assessed by measuring changes in membrane potential sensing dye responses of TE-671 cells expressing (a1)2ß1'd nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Changes in cell membrane potential from the addition of agonists were measured as changes in fluorescence of a membrane potential-sensitive dye and normalized to the maximum epibatidine response. MLA at nanomolar concentrations potentiated the membrane potential sensing dye response of TE-671 cells to acetylcholine and epibatidine. The amount of potentiation was agonist-dependant as well as concentration-dependant. These results suggest that the poisoning of livestock by Delphinium spp. is more complex than previously thought and that the potentiation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors may alter the toxicity of MLA in susceptible animals.

Last Modified: 11/22/2014
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