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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONTROLLING EGG CONTAMINATION WITH SALMONELLA ENTERICA BY UNDERSTANDING ITS EVOLUTION AND PATHOBIOLOGY

Location: Egg Safety and Quality

Title: Salmonella Growth and Deposition Inside Eggs: Implications for Refrigeration as a Control Strategy

Author
item Gast, Richard

Submitted to: Georgia Poultry Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: September 27, 2010
Publication Date: October 10, 2010
Citation: Gast, R.K. 2010. Salmonella Growth and Deposition Inside Eggs: Implications for Refrigeration as a Control Strategy. Georgia Poultry Conference Proceedings. Available: http://www.poultry.uga.edu/gaconference10.htm..

Technical Abstract: A recent risk assessment for Salmonella Enteritidis contamination of eggs concluded that prompt refrigeration of freshly laid eggs was among the most promising disease mitigation strategies. ARS research has provided detailed information about the deposition, movement, and multiplication of Salmonella within eggs which is relevant for effective application of refrigeration. Laying hens infected with some Salmonella serotypes (particularly Enteritidis and Heidelberg) can lay internally contaminated eggs as a consequence of the colonization of reproductive organs, but initial contamination of freshly laid eggs typically involves very small numbers of cells and rarely occurs inside the egg yolk. Warm temperatures can allow substantial multiplication of Salmonella in association with egg yolks (either on the exterior surface or after penetration into the interior contents) during the first 24-36 hours of storage, but refrigeration prevents both penetration and multiplication by Salmonella.

Last Modified: 8/21/2014
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