Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ALASKA FISH PROCESSING BYPRODUCTS Title: Effect of Inclusion of Salmon Roe on Characteristics of Salmon Baby Food Products

Authors
item Desantos, F -
item Bechtel, Peter
item Smiley, S -
item Brewer, M -

Submitted to: Journal of Food Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 3, 2010
Publication Date: May 3, 2010
Citation: Desantos, F.A., Bechtel, P.J., Smiley, S., Brewer, M.S. 2010. Effect of Inclusion of Salmon Roe on Characteristics of Salmon Baby Food Products. Journal of Food Science. 75:S231-236.

Interpretive Summary: Incorporating roe into baby food products could potentially increase the nutritive value of these products,; however, retort processing can be expected to alter salmon-based food products. Roe can undergo changes from heating resulting in loss or dulling of the characteristic color. While this may have no effect on the nutritional quality, it may affect sensory quality and limit roe inclusion in products. The suitability of roe from red and pink salmon for this application is unknown. This study examines 6 combinations of retort processed salmon and roe baby food products designed to meet the definition of a toddler “high meat dinner”. Baby food was formulated from sockeye salmon (puree alone, puree +chunks, puree +pink row, puree +pink row +chunks, puree +red row, puree +red roe +chunks). In the 1st study samples containing roe were lighter and less red than samples without roe. Salmon flavor was stronger in samples containing roe from sockeye salmon. In the 2nd study, retort processed samples were stored at room temperature for 6 mo. Once retort processed, these products were quite stable in terms of color, odor, and had low levels of lipid oxidation. Potential nutrient contributions of this type of product to the infant diet warrant additional research.

Technical Abstract: Baby food was formulated from sockeye salmon (puree alone, puree +chunks, puree +pink row, puree +pink row +chunks, puree +red row, puree +red roe +chunks). In the 1st study, physical (pH, instrumental color, water activity) and descriptive sensory (odor, flavor, texture, visual color) characteristics were determined. Samples containing roe were lighter and less red (by approximately 3 to 4 a * units) than formulations without roe regardless of the type of roe added. Visual pink color followed the same trend. Formulations with roe, both pink and sockeye, were almost twice as fibrous as formulations without roe. Salmon flavor was stronger in samples containing roe from sockeye salmon. In the 2nd study, retort processed samples were stored at room temperature for 6 mo. Sweaty odor decreased over storage time. Visual cream-brown color correlated with L* , a * , b*,and chroma values (r =-0.80, 0.75, 0.80, and 0.84, respectively). TBARS values of all samples were < 0.35 mg MDA/kg and declined after month 0 indicating that these products were oxidatively stable. Overall, adding roe to these products lightened them and increased fibrous texture. Samples containing sockeye salmon roe had stronger salmon flavor. Once retort processed, these products were quite stable in terms of color, odor, and TBARS. Potential nutrient contributions of this type of product to the infant diet warrant additional research.

Last Modified: 7/30/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page