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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: FARMING PRACTICES FOR THE NORTHERN CORN BELT TO PROTECT SOIL RESOURCES, SUPPORT BIOFUEL PRODUCTION AND REDUCE GLOBAL WARMING POTENTIAL Title: Nitrous Oxide Emissions in Medium and Coarse Textured Soils from Corn Production Under Conventional and Alternative Fertilizer Treatments

Authors
item Maharjan, Bijesh -
item Venterea, Rodney
item Rosen, Carl -

Submitted to: ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meeting Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: May 1, 2010
Publication Date: October 31, 2010
Citation: Maharjan, B., Venterea, R.T., Rosen, C. 2010. Nitrous Oxide Emissions in Medium and Coarse Textured Soils from Corn Production Under Conventional and Alternative Fertilizer Treatments [abstract]. ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meeting Abstracts. Paper No. 967.

Technical Abstract: Nitrogen (N) fertilizers applied in corn production cause soil-to-atmosphere direct emission of nitrous oxide (N2O), a major greenhouse gas. Some of the added N that leaches into groundwater as nitrate (NO3-) can subsequently be transformed to N2O, which represents an indirect source of N2O emissions. Different N fertilizers applied in diverse agronomic practices may have varied impacts on N2O emission, which, if properly understood, will help to improve management practices to reduce N2O emissions. The objective of this study was to compare N2O emissions from corn production under various N fertilizers combined with different management practices. We conducted experiments at two sites, Becker and Rosemount, MN. In this study, we compared conventionally-applied anhydrous ammonia (AA), a shallow applied AA, conventional granular urea, polymer-coated urea, and urea amended with urease and nitrification inhibitors. We also studied the impact of tillage, irrigation and pH management. Direct N2O emissions were measured using static chambers. Indirect N2O emissions were estimated based on measurement of soil water NO3- concentration collected using ceramic cups lysimeters combined with water-balance estimates of water leaching rates, and published emission factors for estimating the fraction of leached NO3- that is eventually converted to N2O.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014