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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: HIGHER DIPTERA PESTS OF LIVESTOCK, POULTRY, AND HUMAN HEALTH: INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT AND ADULT BIOLOGY

Location: Mosquito and Fly Research Unit

Title: Temporal and spatial trends in adult nuisance fly populations on Australian cattle feedlots.

Authors
item Urech, R. -
item Bright, R. -
item Green, P. -
item Brown, G. -
item Hogsette, Jerome
item Skerman, A. -
item Elson-Harris, M. -
item Mayer, D. -

Submitted to: Australian Journal of Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 13, 2011
Publication Date: January 15, 2012
Citation: Urech, R., Bright, R.L., Green, P.E., Brown, G.W., Hogsette, Jr, J.A., Skerman, A.G., Elson-Harris, M.M., Mayer, D.G. 2012. Temporal and spatial trends in adult nuisance fly populations on Australian cattle feedlots. Australian Journal of Entomology. 51:88-96.

Interpretive Summary: Australians produce beef on large feedlots and nuisance fly complaints have been numerous. To better control flies, more information was needed about fly species and their biology. Therefore, USDA, Agricultural Research Service scientists in Gainesville, FL, worked cooperatively for 3 years with Australian scientists to determine species composition, seasonality and distribution of adult flies on a Queensland feedlot. The 3-year study showed that house fly and blow fly adults constituted 38% and 42%, respectively, of fly species. House flies and blow flies were numerous in spring, summer and fall, and all commonly trapped fly species had low populations during the coldest winter months, July and August.

Technical Abstract: Like the US, Australia produces beef on large feedlots. Complaints of fly problems prompted a request for information on biology and management of feedlot flies. Therefore, USDA-CMAVE scientists worked cooperatively for 3 years with Australian scientists to determine species composition, seasonality and distribution of adult flies on a Queensland feedlot. House fly and blow fly adults constituted 38% and 42%, respectively, of fly species. House flies and blow flies were numerous in spring, summer and fall, and all commonly trapped fly species had low populations during the coldest winter months, July and August.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014