Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: COUNTERMEASURES TO PREVENT AND CONTROL BRUCELLOSIS IN LIVESTOCK AND WILDLIFE RESERVOIRS Title: Brucellosis

Authors
item Olsen, Steven
item Garin-Bastuji, B -
item Blasco, J -
item Nicola, A -
item Samartino, L -

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: May 30, 2011
Publication Date: January 31, 2012
Citation: Olsen, S.C., Garin-Bastuji, B., Blasco, J.M., Nicola, A.M., Samartino, L. 2012. Brucellosis. In: Zimmerman, J.J., Karriker, L.A., Ramirez, A., Schwartz, K.J., Stevenson, G.W., editors. Diseases of Swine. 10th edition. Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley-Blackwell. p. 697-708.

Interpretive Summary: Brucella suisis an intracellular pathogen that causes reproductive losses in swine and zoonotic infections in people. Although an eradication program based on serologic detection and whole-herd depopulation has nearly eradicated the disease in the United States, it is endemic in feral swine. The bacteria is a significant human pathogen and is a significant cause of reported cases of human brucellosis in the U.S. Other countries around the world are also struggling with the economic costs associated with human infection or from being endemic in domestic livestock. This review discusses the epidemiology, lesions, immunity, and prevention and control of Brucella suis. Like other Brucella, this species use multiple molecular mechanisms to modify their environment in host cells and facilitate survival and replication and immunologic protection is via cell-mediated immunity. Regulatory programs are the most cost-efficient way to control Brucella suis and prevent human infection.

Technical Abstract: Brucella suisis an intracellular pathogen that causes reproductive losses in swine and zoonotic infections in people. Althought an eradication program based on serologic detection and whole-herd depopulation has nearly eradicated the disease in the United States, it is endemic in feral swine. The bacteria is a significant human pathogen and is a significant cause of reported cases of human brucellosis in the U.S. Other countries around the world are also struggling with the economic costs associated with human infection or from being endemic in domestic livestock. This review discusses the epidemiology, lesions, immunity, and prevention and control of Brucella suis. Like other Brucella, this species use multiple molecular mechanisms to modify their environment in host cells and facilitate survival and replication and immunologic protection is via cell-mediated immunity. Regulatory programs are the most cost-efficient way to control Brucella suis and prevent human infection.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page