Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: NEW TECHNOLOGIES TO PROCESS VALUE-ADDED, HEALTHY FOODS FROM FRUITS AND VEGETABLES Title: Development of Conducting Polyaniline/ Poly(Lactic Acid) Nanofibers by Electrospinning

Authors
item Picciani, Paulo -
item Medeiros, Eliton -
item Pan, Zhongli
item Orts, William
item Mattoso, Luiz -
item Soares, Bluma -

Submitted to: Journal of Applied Polymer Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 15, 2008
Publication Date: April 15, 2009
Citation: Picciani, P., Medeiros, E., Pan, Z., Orts, W.J., Mattoso, L., Soares, B. 2009. Development of Conducting Polyaniline/ Poly(Lactic Acid) Nanofibers by Electrospinning. Journal of Applied Polymer Science. 112(2):744-751.

Interpretive Summary: This research developed a method to produce ultrafine fibers consisting of blends of polyaniline doped with p-toluene sulfonic acid and poly(L-lactic acid) by electrospinning. The presence of polyaniline resulted in fibers with diameters as thin as 100–200 nm and a significant reduction of bead formation.

Technical Abstract: Ultrafine fibers consisting of blends of polyaniline doped with p-toluene sulfonic acid and poly(L-lactic acid) were prepared by electrospinning. The presence of polyaniline resulted in fibers with diameters as thin as 100– 200 nm and a significant reduction of bead formation. These fibers were visually homogeneous, and this indicated good interactions between the components of the polyaniline/poly(L-lactic acid) blend. The high interaction between the components and the rapid evaporation of the solvent during electrospinning resulted in nanofibers with a lower degree of crystallinity in comparison with cast films. The electrical conductivity of the electrospun fiber mats was lower than that of blend films produced by casting, probably because of the lower degree of crystallinity of the polyaniline dispersion and the high porosity of the nonwoven mat. This novel system opens up new and interesting opportunities for applications in biomedical device, biodegradable materials, and sensors, among other things.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page