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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONSERVATION SYSTEMS RESEARCH FOR IMPROVING ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND PRODUCER PROFITABILITY

Location: National Soil Dynamics Laboratory

Title: Organic Weed Control in White Lupin (Lupinus albus L.)

Authors
item Folgart, Anika -
item PRICE, ANDREW
item Van Santen, Edzard -
item Wehtje, Glenn -

Submitted to: Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 1, 2010
Publication Date: July 15, 2011
Citation: Folgart, A., Price, A.J., Van Santen, E., Wehtje, G.R. 2011. Organic weed control in white lupin (Lupinus albus L.). Renewable Agriculture and Food System. 26:193-199.

Interpretive Summary: Legumes provide a valuable nitrogen source in organic agriculture. With organic farming becoming an increasing sector of US agriculture and white lupin interest increasing in the southeastern USA because winter hardy cultivars are available, non-chemical weed control practices in lupin are needed. Five weed control practices were evaluated: one PRE-applied herbicide (S-metolachlor), two mechanical (hand hoed) and two cultural (living mulch) weed control treatments. Grain in the organic treatments was equivalent. The cultivation treatments and black oat companions were successful alternative weed control practices in white lupin production.

Technical Abstract: Legumes such as white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) provide a valuable nitrogen source in organic agriculture. With organic farming becoming an increasing sector of US agriculture and white lupin interest increasing in the southeastern USA because winter hardy cultivars are available, non-chemical weed control practices in lupin are needed. A two-year experiment was established at two locations in Alabama. Five weed control practices were evaluated: one PRE-applied herbicide (S-metolachlor), two mechanical (hand hoed) and two cultural (living mulch) weed control treatments. Fourteen weed species were encountered. S-metolachlor provided above 80% control of most weed species present in this experiment. The cultivation treatments and black oat companion crops also provided good weed control of many of the weeds encountered. Crop injury of all treatments was low on a 0 to 10 scale with 0 representing no injury: < 2.0, <1 .3 and < 1.2 by S-metolachlor, the cultivation treatments and the black oat companion crops, respectively. Grain yield of cultivars ABL 1082, AU Alpha and AU Homer were 1540, 1130, 850 kg ha-1, respectively when treated with the conventional treatment S-metolachlor. Grain in the organic treatments was equivalent. The cultivation treatments and black oat companions were successful alternative weed control practices in white lupin production.

Last Modified: 8/19/2014
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