Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOP AND IMPROVE STRATEGIES FOR MANAGEMENT OF IRRIGATED AGRICULTURAL CROPS AND SOILS

Location: Northwest Irrigation and Soils Research

Title: Evaluation of In-Row Plant Spacing and Planting Configuration for Three Irrigated Potato Cultivars

Authors
item Tarkalson, David
item King, Bradley
item Bjorneberg, David
item Taberna, John -

Submitted to: American Journal of Potato Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 20, 2010
Publication Date: February 7, 2011
Citation: Tarkalson, D.D., King, B.A., Bjorneberg, D.L., Taberna, J.P. 2011. Evaluation of In-Row Plant Spacing and Planting Configuration for Three Irrigated Potato Cultivars. American Journal of Potato Research. http://www.springerlink.com/content/5n1l376u0862g70x/fulltext.pdf.

Interpretive Summary: Research studies have shown that planting potatoes in a bed configuration can improve water movement into the potato root zone. However, plant spacing recommendations are needed for potatoes planted in a bed configuration. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of in-row plant spacing and planting configuration (4 row conventional ridged-row, 5 row bed, and 7 row bed) on yield of Russet Burbank, Russet Norkotah, and Ranger Russet potatoes under sprinkler irrigation. Optimum production of Russet Norkotah and Ranger Russet potatoes are possible under the planting configuration and plant spacing treatments evaluated in this study, granting growers flexibility in their systems. Evidence suggests that production of Russet Burbank maybe less suited to bed planting configurations.

Technical Abstract: Research studies have shown that planting potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) in a bed configuration can improve water movement into the potato root zone. However, plant spacing recommendations are needed for potatoes planted in a bed configuration. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of in-row plant spacing and planting configuration on yield of Russet Burbank, Russet Norkotah, and Ranger Russet potatoes under sprinkler irrigation. For the three varieties, the effect of in-row plant spacing (three spacing treatments) for each planting configuration (4 row conventional ridged-row [4RC], 5 row bed [5RB], and 7 row bed [7RB]), and the effect of planting configuration on total tuber yield, U.S. No. 1 tuber yield, percent No. 1 tubers, average size (by weight), and marketable tuber yield were investigated at the USDA-ARS Northwest Irrigation & Soils Research Lab in Kimberly, ID on a Portneuf silt loam (coarse-silty mixed mesic Durixerollic Calciorthid) in 2008 and 2009. The greatest influence of in-row plant spacing was on average size. In general, for the 4RC planting configuration, as plant spacing increased (plant population decreased) the average tuber size increased by a range of 14 to 30% across all varieties. There was little influence of in-row spacing on measured production variables under the bed planting configurations. Within variety and planting configurations in 2008 and 2009, there were few differences in total tuber yield, U.S. No. 1 tuber yield, percent No. 1 tubers, or marketable tuber yield across in-row plant spacing treatments. For Russet Norkotah and Ranger Russet in 2008 and 2009, there were no differences in total tuber yield, U.S. No. 1 tuber yield, percent No. 1 tubers, average tuber size, or marketable tuber yield between planting configuration treatments. For Russet Burbank, the 4RC planting configuration had 14.6% significantly greater total tuber yield than the 7RB planting configuration, and 20.2% greater U.S. No. 1 tuber yield than both bed planting configurations in 2009. Optimum production of Russet Norkotah and Ranger Russet potatoes are possible under the planting configuration and plant spacing treatments evaluated in this study, granting growers flexibility in their systems. Evidence suggests that production of Russet Burbank maybe less suited to bed planting configurations.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page