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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONSERVATION SYSTEMS RESEARCH FOR IMPROVING ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND PRODUCER PROFITABILITY Title: Peanut Response to Starter Fertilizer across Tillage Systems

Authors
item Balkcom, Kipling
item Tubbs, R -

Submitted to: Southern Conservation Agricultural Systems Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: July 20, 2010
Publication Date: July 20, 2010
Citation: Balkcom, K.S., Tubbs, R.S. 2010. Peanut response to starter fertilizer across tillage systems. In: Endale, D.M., Iversen, K.V., editors. Proceedings of the 32nd Southern Conservation Agricultural Systems Conference, July 20-23, 2010, Jackson, Tennessee. CDROM. Available at: http://www.ag.auburn.edu/auxiliary/nsdl/scasc/.

Interpretive Summary: The benefits of conservation systems have been documented across the Southeast, however, the widespread adoption of conservation systems for peanut (Arachis hypogea L.) lags behind other crops. Starter fertilizers, which supply soluble fertilizer near the root zone of young plants, have been successfully adopted in conservation systems with other crops. However, limited research has investigated how peanut responds to starter fertilizer. Scientists with USDA-ARS located at the National Soil Dynamics Laboratory in Auburn, AL in cooperation with Univ. of Georgia initiated a study to determine the interactive effects of various starter fertilizer combinations and placements for two planting dates across conventional and conservation tillage peanut production systems during the 2008 and 2009 growing seasons. In 2008, strip tillage peanuts from the first planting date and conventional tillage peanuts from the second planting date averaged 14% greater yields compared to the other planting date and tillage combinations. In 2009, conventional tillage peanut yields from the second planting date were 20% higher compared to all other combinations. These preliminary findings do not provide strong evidence for the use of starter fertilizers in peanut production, but this summary only represents the findings over two years. On-going experiments related to starter fertilizer use in peanuts are continuing and will provide further evidence to determine their applicability.

Technical Abstract: The benefits of conservation systems have been documented across the Southeast, however, the widespread adoption of conservation systems for peanut (Arachis hypogea L.) lags behind other crops. Starter fertilizers, which supply soluble fertilizer near the root zone of young plants, have been successfully adopted in conservation systems with other crops. However, limited research has investigated how peanut responds to starter fertilizer. Our objectives were to determine the interactive effects of various starter fertilizer combinations and placements for two planting dates across conventional and conservation tillage peanut production systems during the 2008 and 2009 growing seasons. In 2008, strip tillage peanuts from the first planting date and conventional tillage peanuts from the second planting date averaged 14% greater yields compared to the other planting date and tillage combinations. In 2009, conventional tillage peanut yields from the second planting date were 20% higher compared to all other combinations. These preliminary findings do not provide strong evidence for the use of starter fertilizers in peanut production, but this summary only represents the findings over two years. On-going experiments related to starter fertilizer use in peanuts are continuing and will provide further evidence to determine their applicability.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
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