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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CHARACTERIZING AND MANAGING ANIMAL STRESS/WELL-BEING IN LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION Title: Benefits of Providing Shade to Feedlot Cattle of Different Breeds

Authors
item Brown Brandl, Tami
item Eigenberg, Roger
item Nienaber, John -

Submitted to: Proceedings of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers International (ASABE)
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: June 18, 2010
Publication Date: June 20, 2010
Citation: Brown Brandl, T.M., Eigenberg, R.A., Nienaber, J.A. 2010. Benefits of Providing Shade to Feedlot Cattle of Different Breeds. In: Proceedings of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers International (ASABE), June 20-23, 2010, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Paper No. 1009517.

Technical Abstract: Heat stress in cattle causes a decrease in feed intake and growth and, in extreme cases, can cause death of vulnerable animals. A simple shade can reduce the animal's radiant heat load by 30% or more. However, for most feedlots, adding shade structures to all pens is cost prohibitive. The objective of this study was to determine how animals, with known risk factors (color, previous cases of pneumonia, condition score, and temperament) for heat stress, respond to having access to shade. Feedlot heifers (384 animals; 128 animals/year for 3 years) of two breeds (Angus and Charolais) and two cross breeds (MARC I [1/4 Charolais, 1/4 Braunvieh, 1/4 Limousin, 1/8 Angus, and 1/8 Hereford] and MARC III [1/4 Pinzgauer, 1/4 Red Poll, 1/4 Hereford, and 1/4 Angus]) were selected and penned on the basis of weight and breed. Heifers were weighed, condition scored, and temperament scored every 28 days. Heat tolerance was accessed by measurements of respiration rate taken twice daily at 0800 and 1300 h on a preselected group of 64 animals. It was determined that the shade lowered the stress level of all animals, and had a greater impact on the black than the white animals, with the dark red- and tan-hided animals in the middle. However, shade did not impact weights or gains of any of the breeds.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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